Europe

Report: US-based Turkish navy officer 'missing' after coup

  • A tourist exits from Arasta Bazaar, in the historic Sultanahmet district of Istanbul, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016. Tourism is a key sector and foreign-currency earner for Turkey but numbers this year were already down before the attempted coup of July 15th and is expected to be sharply lower as a result of a series of attacks in the country over the past few months. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)

    A tourist exits from Arasta Bazaar, in the historic Sultanahmet district of Istanbul, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016. Tourism is a key sector and foreign-currency earner for Turkey but numbers this year were already down before the attempted coup of July 15th and is expected to be sharply lower as a result of a series of attacks in the country over the past few months. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)  (The Associated Press)

  • A shop owner checks his cell phone at the empty Arasta Bazaar, in the historic Sultanahmet district of Istanbul, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016. Tourism is a key sector and foreign-currency earner for Turkey but numbers this year were already down before the attempted coup of July 15th and is expected to be sharply lower as a result of a series of attacks in the country over the past few months. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)

    A shop owner checks his cell phone at the empty Arasta Bazaar, in the historic Sultanahmet district of Istanbul, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016. Tourism is a key sector and foreign-currency earner for Turkey but numbers this year were already down before the attempted coup of July 15th and is expected to be sharply lower as a result of a series of attacks in the country over the past few months. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)  (The Associated Press)

  • Tourists visit the Sultan Ahmed Mosque, also known as Blue Mosque, in Istanbul, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016. Tourism is a key sector and foreign-currency earner for Turkey but numbers this year were already down before the attempted coup of July 15th and is expected to be sharply lower as a result of a series of attacks in the country over the past few months. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)

    Tourists visit the Sultan Ahmed Mosque, also known as Blue Mosque, in Istanbul, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016. Tourism is a key sector and foreign-currency earner for Turkey but numbers this year were already down before the attempted coup of July 15th and is expected to be sharply lower as a result of a series of attacks in the country over the past few months. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)  (The Associated Press)

Turkey's state-run news agency says a Turkish naval officer working in the United States has gone missing and has failed to report back home following a failed coup by renegade officers within the Turkish military.

The Anadolu Agency, citing an official at the Turkish embassy in Washington, says Navy Rear Admiral Mustafa Ugurlu had left his ID and badges at his base on July 22 and has not been heard from since.

Turkish officials could not confirm reports that Ugurlu was seeking asylum in the United States. The U.S. State Department said it does not comment on or handle asylum cases.

The issue could complicate US-Turkish ties. Ankara is already pressing Washington to extradite U.S.-based Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen, who it accuses of orchestrating the coup. Gulen denies involvement.