Europe

Nervous crowd blocks access to Turkish military base

  • Pro-government supporters wave a Turkish flag as they protest on Istanbul's iconic Bosporus Bridge, late Thursday, July 21, 2016. Turkish lawmakers approved a three-month state of emergency, endorsing new powers for Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan that would allow him to expand a crackdown that has already included mass arrests and the closure of hundreds of schools, in the wake of the July 15 failed coup. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    Pro-government supporters wave a Turkish flag as they protest on Istanbul's iconic Bosporus Bridge, late Thursday, July 21, 2016. Turkish lawmakers approved a three-month state of emergency, endorsing new powers for Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan that would allow him to expand a crackdown that has already included mass arrests and the closure of hundreds of schools, in the wake of the July 15 failed coup. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)  (The Associated Press)

  • Pro-government supporters protest on the road leading to Istanbul's iconic Bosporus Bridge, not seen, late Thursday, July 21, 2016. Turkish lawmakers approved a three-month state of emergency, endorsing new powers for Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan that would allow him to expand a crackdown that has already included mass arrests and the closure of hundreds of schools, in the wake of the July 15 failed coup. (AP Photo/Emrah Gurel)

    Pro-government supporters protest on the road leading to Istanbul's iconic Bosporus Bridge, not seen, late Thursday, July 21, 2016. Turkish lawmakers approved a three-month state of emergency, endorsing new powers for Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan that would allow him to expand a crackdown that has already included mass arrests and the closure of hundreds of schools, in the wake of the July 15 failed coup. (AP Photo/Emrah Gurel)  (The Associated Press)

  • Pro-government supporters protest on the road leading to Istanbul's iconic Bosporus Bridge,background left, Thursday, July 21, 2016. Turkish lawmakers convened to endorse sweeping new powers for Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan that would allow him to expand a crackdown in the wake of July 15 failed coup. The 550-member parliament is set to approve Erdogan's request for a three-month state of emergency. (AP Photo/Emrah Gurel)

    Pro-government supporters protest on the road leading to Istanbul's iconic Bosporus Bridge,background left, Thursday, July 21, 2016. Turkish lawmakers convened to endorse sweeping new powers for Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan that would allow him to expand a crackdown in the wake of July 15 failed coup. The 550-member parliament is set to approve Erdogan's request for a three-month state of emergency. (AP Photo/Emrah Gurel)  (The Associated Press)

A large crowd blocked access overnight to a Turkish military base in the capital amid nervousness following last week's failed coup attempt.

The streets of Turkey's major cities were quiet Friday, a day after Turkish lawmakers approved a three-month state of emergency that allows the government to extend detention times and issue decrees without parliamentary approval.

However, in a sign of the underlying tensions in the country, protesters went to the Etimesgut military base in Ankara late Thursday and parked trucks and a bulldozer outside — possibly for fear that tanks might try to leave the facility.

It was not clear what sparked the tension and power to the base appeared to have been cut.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan says the state of emergency will counter threats to Turkish democracy.