Europe

Italian Bishop decries neglect of south after train crash

  • Andria bishop Luigi Mansi blesses the victims of a train crash during their funeral service in Andria, Southern Italy, Saturday, July 16, 2016. On July 12, two four-carriage trains collided head-on on a single-track stretch between Ruvo di Puglia and Corato, southern Italy, killing 23 people and injuring dozens. (Francesco Ammendola/Italian presidency via AP Photo)

    Andria bishop Luigi Mansi blesses the victims of a train crash during their funeral service in Andria, Southern Italy, Saturday, July 16, 2016. On July 12, two four-carriage trains collided head-on on a single-track stretch between Ruvo di Puglia and Corato, southern Italy, killing 23 people and injuring dozens. (Francesco Ammendola/Italian presidency via AP Photo)  (The Associated Press)

  • People pay respect to the victims of a train crash during their funeral service in Andria, Southern Italy, Saturday, July 16, 2016. On July 12, two four-carriage trains collided head-on on a single-track stretch between Ruvo di Puglia and Corato, southern Italy, killing 23 people and injuring dozens. (Tony Vece/ANSA via AP Photo)

    People pay respect to the victims of a train crash during their funeral service in Andria, Southern Italy, Saturday, July 16, 2016. On July 12, two four-carriage trains collided head-on on a single-track stretch between Ruvo di Puglia and Corato, southern Italy, killing 23 people and injuring dozens. (Tony Vece/ANSA via AP Photo)  (The Associated Press)

An Italian bishop at the funeral for victims of a head-on crash between commuter trains is decrying what he calls the neglect of Italy's south.

Andria Bishop Luigi Mansi led mourners Saturday in a sports stadium, where the coffins of 13 of the 23 killed in the crash were laid side-by-side. Separate funerals are planned for the other victims.

Two trains collided Tuesday on a single track in an olive grove in Puglia, southeastern Italy.

Mansi said the south for too long has been considered "Italy's periphery" and cited a "lack of scruples" behind policies to save money at the expense of lives.

Human error is blamed for putting the trains on a collision course, but investigators also want to know why a second track wasn't built despite available funds.