Asia

Philippines won't sacrifice sea feud victory in China talks

  • New Philippine Solicitor General Jose Calida talks to the media during a break in the forum on Tuesday's ruling by the Hague-based UN international arbitration tribunal favoring the Philippines in its case against China on the dispute in South China Sea Friday, July 15, 2016 in suburban Quezon city, northeast of Manila, Philippines. The tribunal has found that there is no legal basis for China's "nine-dash line" claiming rights to much of the South China Sea. The tribunal issued its ruling Tuesday, July 12, 2016 in The Hague in response to an arbitration case brought by the Philippines against China. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

    New Philippine Solicitor General Jose Calida talks to the media during a break in the forum on Tuesday's ruling by the Hague-based UN international arbitration tribunal favoring the Philippines in its case against China on the dispute in South China Sea Friday, July 15, 2016 in suburban Quezon city, northeast of Manila, Philippines. The tribunal has found that there is no legal basis for China's "nine-dash line" claiming rights to much of the South China Sea. The tribunal issued its ruling Tuesday, July 12, 2016 in The Hague in response to an arbitration case brought by the Philippines against China. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)  (The Associated Press)

  • Philippine Judge Raul Pangalangan of the International Criminal Court, left, Lawrence Martin, second left, counsel for the Philippines in Philippines versus China Arbitration, Philippine Supreme Court Senior Associate Justice Antonio Carpio, second right, and Philippine Consul General to San Francisco Henry Bensurto Jr. pose for the media following a forum on the ruling by the Hague-based UN international arbitration tribunal favoring the Philippines in its case against China on the South China Sea Friday, July 15, 2016 in suburban Quezon city, northeast of Manila, Philippines. The tribunal issued its ruling Tuesday, July 12, 2016 in The Hague saying there is no legal basis for China's "nine-dash line" claiming rights to much of the South China Sea. Carpio, Martin and Bensurto Jr. were members of the Philippine panel that filed the case against China in The Hague. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

    Philippine Judge Raul Pangalangan of the International Criminal Court, left, Lawrence Martin, second left, counsel for the Philippines in Philippines versus China Arbitration, Philippine Supreme Court Senior Associate Justice Antonio Carpio, second right, and Philippine Consul General to San Francisco Henry Bensurto Jr. pose for the media following a forum on the ruling by the Hague-based UN international arbitration tribunal favoring the Philippines in its case against China on the South China Sea Friday, July 15, 2016 in suburban Quezon city, northeast of Manila, Philippines. The tribunal issued its ruling Tuesday, July 12, 2016 in The Hague saying there is no legal basis for China's "nine-dash line" claiming rights to much of the South China Sea. Carpio, Martin and Bensurto Jr. were members of the Philippine panel that filed the case against China in The Hague. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)  (The Associated Press)

  • Japanese Prof. Mariko Kawano, left, of international law at Waseda University, former Australian National Security Adviser Andrew Shearer, second left, Center for Strategic and International Studies Senior Adviser Murray Hiebert, center, Lawrence Martin, second right, counsel for the Philippines in Philippines versus China Arbitration and Philippine Consul General to San Francisco Henry Bensurto Jr. pose for the media following a forum on the ruling by the Hague-based UN international arbitration tribunal favoring the Philippines in its case against China on the South China Sea Friday, July 15, 2016 in suburban Quezon city, northeast of Manila, Philippines. The tribunal issued its ruling Tuesday, July 12 in The Hague saying there is no legal basis for China's "nine-dash line" claiming rights to much of the South China Sea. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

    Japanese Prof. Mariko Kawano, left, of international law at Waseda University, former Australian National Security Adviser Andrew Shearer, second left, Center for Strategic and International Studies Senior Adviser Murray Hiebert, center, Lawrence Martin, second right, counsel for the Philippines in Philippines versus China Arbitration and Philippine Consul General to San Francisco Henry Bensurto Jr. pose for the media following a forum on the ruling by the Hague-based UN international arbitration tribunal favoring the Philippines in its case against China on the South China Sea Friday, July 15, 2016 in suburban Quezon city, northeast of Manila, Philippines. The tribunal issued its ruling Tuesday, July 12 in The Hague saying there is no legal basis for China's "nine-dash line" claiming rights to much of the South China Sea. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)  (The Associated Press)

The Philippine solicitor general says the government will fight for the country's landmark victory in arbitration to be upheld when it talks to China about their disputes in the South China Sea.

Solicitor General Jose Calida disclosed the Philippine position on Friday. The position runs against that of China, which ignored the ruling and opposes use of the decision as basis for any negotiations.

The decision handed down Tuesday by the tribunal in The Hague invalidated Beijing's expansive claims in the South China Sea as sought by the Philippines based on a U.N. treaty that governs the world's oceans.

President Rodrigo Duterte has been more reconciliatory to China that his predecessor, Benigno Aquino III, who filed the case against Beijing in 2013, straining relations.