Europe

Spain votes again in attempt to break government stalemate

  • A man casts his vote for the national elections in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday, June. 25, 2016. Spaniards voted Sunday in an unprecedented repeat election that aimed to break six months of political deadlock after a December ballot left the country without an elected government. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

    A man casts his vote for the national elections in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday, June. 25, 2016. Spaniards voted Sunday in an unprecedented repeat election that aimed to break six months of political deadlock after a December ballot left the country without an elected government. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)  (The Associated Press)

  • A man picks a ballot paper before casting his vote for the national elections in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday, June. 25, 2016. Spaniards are voting in a general election, just six months after a last unsuccessful attempt to pick a new government. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

    A man picks a ballot paper before casting his vote for the national elections in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday, June. 25, 2016. Spaniards are voting in a general election, just six months after a last unsuccessful attempt to pick a new government. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)  (The Associated Press)

  • A man waits for the opening of a polling station before casting his vote for the national elections in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday, June. 25, 2016. Spaniards are voting in a general election, just six months after a last unsuccessful attempt to pick a new government. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

    A man waits for the opening of a polling station before casting his vote for the national elections in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday, June. 25, 2016. Spaniards are voting in a general election, just six months after a last unsuccessful attempt to pick a new government. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)  (The Associated Press)

Spaniards are voting in an unprecedented repeat election that aims to break six months of political deadlock after a December ballot left the country without an elected government.

Opinion polls in recent weeks have unanimously predicted the new ballot Sunday will also fail to deliver enough votes for any one party to take power alone.

That would likely consign Spain to another period of protracted political negotiations — and, possibly, another ballot if there is no breakthrough.

Recent polls have suggested the conservative Popular Party would win most votes but would again fall short of a parliamentary majority.

Political negotiations could be complicated by increased support for a new far-left alliance called Unidos Podemos (United We Can), which is expected to finish second.