The Latest on Spain's national election (all times local):

8 p.m.

An exit poll in Spain's general election indicates the conservative Popular Party has collected most votes but won't have enough seats in Parliament to form a government on its own.

The poll by public broadcaster Radiotelevision Espanola gave the incumbent Popular Party 28.5 percent of the vote in Sunday's ballot and says a new leftist alliance called Unidos Podemos (United We Can) came in second with 25.6 percent.

The center-left Socialists were third with 22 percent, followed by the moderate, business-friendly Ciudadanos with 11.8 percent. The poll did not provide a margin of error nor exactly how its projections were made.

Sunday's election aimed to break six months of political deadlock after an inconclusive December ballot left the country without an elected government.

___

9 a.m.

Spaniards headed to the polls Sunday for an unprecedented repeat election that aimed to break six months of political deadlock after a December ballot left the country without an elected government.

Public anger at high unemployment, cuts in government spending on cherished services such as welfare and education and unrelenting political corruption scandals have shaped the two-week election campaign.

Opinion polls in recent weeks have unanimously predicted that the new ballot will also fail to deliver enough votes for any one party to take power alone. That would likely consign Spain to more protracted political negotiations - and possibly even another election.

The most recent polls suggest the conservative Popular Party will win most votes Sunday but will again fall short of the parliamentary majority it had from 2011 to 2015. Popular Party leader Mariano Rajoy is hoping to be re-elected as prime minister.