Europe

UK business leaders ask workers to vote to stay in EU

  • British MP Boris Johnson, left,  kisses a wild salmon standing next to with porter Greg Essex at Billingsgate Fish Market in London, Wednesday June 22, 2016 on the final day of campaigning before Thursday's EU Referendum.  (Stefan Rousseau/PA via AP)  UNITED KINGDOM OUT

    British MP Boris Johnson, left, kisses a wild salmon standing next to with porter Greg Essex at Billingsgate Fish Market in London, Wednesday June 22, 2016 on the final day of campaigning before Thursday's EU Referendum. (Stefan Rousseau/PA via AP) UNITED KINGDOM OUT  (The Associated Press)

  • British MP Boris Johnson, left,  holds a wild salmon standing next to  with porter Greg Essex at Billingsgate Fish Market in London, Wednesday June 22, 2016 on the final day of campaigning before Thursday's EU Referendum.  (Stefan Rousseau/PA via AP)  UNITED KINGDOM OUT

    British MP Boris Johnson, left, holds a wild salmon standing next to with porter Greg Essex at Billingsgate Fish Market in London, Wednesday June 22, 2016 on the final day of campaigning before Thursday's EU Referendum. (Stefan Rousseau/PA via AP) UNITED KINGDOM OUT  (The Associated Press)

  • British Prime Minister David Cameron makes a statement appealing for people to vote to remain in the European Union outside 10 Downing Street in London, Tuesday, June 21, 2016. Britain votes whether to stay in the EU in a referendum on Thursday. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

    British Prime Minister David Cameron makes a statement appealing for people to vote to remain in the European Union outside 10 Downing Street in London, Tuesday, June 21, 2016. Britain votes whether to stay in the EU in a referendum on Thursday. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)  (The Associated Press)

Leaders of about half of Britain's largest companies have made a last ditch appeal to their employees to vote for remaining in the European Union.

In a letter to the Times on the eve of Thursday's vote, some 1,285 business leaders — include representatives of half of the FTSE 100 businesses — argue that a vote to leave will hurt the British economy.

Similar letters have been released in the course of the acrimonious campaign. But Wednesday's letter is clearly meant to make the 1.75 million people employed by the signatories to think twice about their vote.

"Britain leaving the EU would mean uncertainty for our firms, less trade with Europe and fewer jobs," the letter says.

The companies represented include Barclays, Standard Life and Anglo American.