GLOBAL ECONOMY

Venezuelan workers return to five-day work week as energy crisis eases

  • CARACAS, VENEZUELA - DECEMBER 02:  A Venezuelan walks past grafitti of revolutionary figure Che Guevara December 2, 2006 in Caracas, Venezuela. President Hugo Chavez faces challenger Manuel Rosales in the presidential elections December 3.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

    CARACAS, VENEZUELA - DECEMBER 02: A Venezuelan walks past grafitti of revolutionary figure Che Guevara December 2, 2006 in Caracas, Venezuela. President Hugo Chavez faces challenger Manuel Rosales in the presidential elections December 3. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)  (2006 Getty Images)

  • SAN CRISTOBAL, VENEZUELA - MARCH 08:  A long que of people queue up before sunrise to buy basic foodstuffs at a supermarket on March 8, 2014 in San Cristobal, the capital of Tachira state, Venezuela. Shortage of such products as flour, milk and sugar have made life increasingly difficult for residents of Tachira, which has been a focal point for anti-government protests for almost a month.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

    SAN CRISTOBAL, VENEZUELA - MARCH 08: A long que of people queue up before sunrise to buy basic foodstuffs at a supermarket on March 8, 2014 in San Cristobal, the capital of Tachira state, Venezuela. Shortage of such products as flour, milk and sugar have made life increasingly difficult for residents of Tachira, which has been a focal point for anti-government protests for almost a month. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)  (2014 Getty Images)

Venezuela's two-day workweek is no more.

Public workers will now work five days a week again because officials say a severe energy crisis has eased.

In April, the South American country's government decreed that public employees would work just Monday and Tuesday in a bid to save energy.

On Monday, the energy minister said water levels at the dam that supplies most of the country's electricity had been somewhat restored. Workers will now go to the office on Wednesdays, Thursday and Fridays until 1 p.m.

Critics said the office closures were useless, because people just went home and ran their own computers and air conditioning units.

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Power outages have been a chronic problem in this oil country. Maduro's predecessor President Hugo Chavez promised to solve the problem in 2010, but little has improved.

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