World

UN official: Peace treaties need to address indigenous women

  • Mariam Wallet Aboubakrine, left, vice-chair of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Victoria Tauli Corpuz, center, U.N. Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, center, and Rosalina Tuyuc, right, founder of the National Association of Guatemalan Widows, hold a press conference, Tuesday May 17, 2016 at U.N. headquarters. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

    Mariam Wallet Aboubakrine, left, vice-chair of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Victoria Tauli Corpuz, center, U.N. Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, center, and Rosalina Tuyuc, right, founder of the National Association of Guatemalan Widows, hold a press conference, Tuesday May 17, 2016 at U.N. headquarters. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)  (The Associated Press)

  • Rosalina Tuyuc, founder of the National Association of Guatemalan Widows, speaks during a press conference at the U.N. Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Tuesday May 17, 2016 at U.N. headquarters. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

    Rosalina Tuyuc, founder of the National Association of Guatemalan Widows, speaks during a press conference at the U.N. Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Tuesday May 17, 2016 at U.N. headquarters. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)  (The Associated Press)

  • Rosalina Tuyuc, founder of the National Association of Guatemalan Widows, speaks during a press conference at the U.N. Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Tuesday May 17, 2016 at U.N. headquarters. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

    Rosalina Tuyuc, founder of the National Association of Guatemalan Widows, speaks during a press conference at the U.N. Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Tuesday May 17, 2016 at U.N. headquarters. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)  (The Associated Press)

A United Nations official says indigenous women are disproportionately the victims of violence in conflict zones, emphasizing that peace treaties must take into account their needs and include clauses to protect this twice marginalized population.

Victoria Tauli Corpuz, the U.N. special rapporteur on the rights of indigenous people, on Tuesday painted a devastating picture of the plight of indigenous women in conflicts, where fighting often leaves indigenous people caught between opposing armies that tend to disrespect their rights and often use sexual violence as a weapon.

Speaking at the 15th Session of the U.N.'s Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Corpuz said she hoped that in the future peace treaties could include clauses about the rights of women as well as the cultural and lands rights of indigenous peoples.