Europe

India says won't try to reclaim Koh-i-Noor diamond from UK

  • FILE- in this April 5, 2002 file photo, The Koh-i-noor, or "mountain of light," diamond, set in the Maltese Cross at the front of the crown made for Britain's late Queen Mother Elizabeth, is seen on her coffin, along with her personal standard, a wreath and a note from her daughter, Queen Elizabeth II, as it is drawn to London's Westminster Hall. India's government has told the country's top court it won't try to reclaim the 106-carat Koh-i-Noor diamond, which is now part of the British crown jewels.The government told the Supreme Court on Monday that the diamond was neither taken away forcibly nor stolen, but was given as a gift to Queen Victoria by an Indian king in the mid-19th century. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant, File)

    FILE- in this April 5, 2002 file photo, The Koh-i-noor, or "mountain of light," diamond, set in the Maltese Cross at the front of the crown made for Britain's late Queen Mother Elizabeth, is seen on her coffin, along with her personal standard, a wreath and a note from her daughter, Queen Elizabeth II, as it is drawn to London's Westminster Hall. India's government has told the country's top court it won't try to reclaim the 106-carat Koh-i-Noor diamond, which is now part of the British crown jewels.The government told the Supreme Court on Monday that the diamond was neither taken away forcibly nor stolen, but was given as a gift to Queen Victoria by an Indian king in the mid-19th century. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE- in this April 5, 2002 file photo, The Koh-i-noor, or "mountain of light," diamond, set in the Maltese Cross at the front of the crown made for Britain's late Queen Mother Elizabeth, is seen on her coffin, along with her personal standard, a wreath and a note from her daughter, Queen Elizabeth II, as it is drawn to London's Westminster Hall. India's government has told the country's top court it won't try to reclaim the 106-carat Koh-i-Noor diamond, which is now part of the British crown jewels.The government told the Supreme Court on Monday that the diamond was neither taken away forcibly nor stolen, but was given as a gift to Queen Victoria by an Indian king in the mid-19th century. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant, File)

    FILE- in this April 5, 2002 file photo, The Koh-i-noor, or "mountain of light," diamond, set in the Maltese Cross at the front of the crown made for Britain's late Queen Mother Elizabeth, is seen on her coffin, along with her personal standard, a wreath and a note from her daughter, Queen Elizabeth II, as it is drawn to London's Westminster Hall. India's government has told the country's top court it won't try to reclaim the 106-carat Koh-i-Noor diamond, which is now part of the British crown jewels.The government told the Supreme Court on Monday that the diamond was neither taken away forcibly nor stolen, but was given as a gift to Queen Victoria by an Indian king in the mid-19th century. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant, File)  (The Associated Press)

India's government has told the country's top court it won't try to reclaim the 106-carat Koh-i-Noor diamond, which is now part of the British crown jewels.

The government told the Supreme Court on Monday that the diamond was neither taken away forcibly nor stolen, but was given as a gift to Queen Victoria by an Indian king in the mid-19th century.

The court was hearing a petition filed by a rights group asking it to direct the government to seek the return of the diamond.

For many Indians, the loss of the Koh-i-Noor is symbolic of India's subjugation and its return is viewed as compensation for the excesses of British colonial rule.

The diamond is on display in the Tower of London, set in front of the Queen Mother's crown.