Europe

Hungary buries remains of Holocaust victims found in Danube

  • Attendees place pebbles atop a memorial tomb with the words 'Son of Man, shall these bones revive?' engraved on it during the burial service of the remains of Jewish people found in River Danube in the Kozma Street Jewish Cemetery in Budapest, Hungary, Friday, April 15, 2016. Human remains found in 2011, including many believed to be of Jews shot on the banks of the Danube River near the end of World War II, were buried Friday in a Jewish cemetery in Budapest. Two wooden caskets containing hundreds of bone fragments were laid to rest according to Jewish customs in a ceremony attended by Christian clergy and government officials.  (Tibor Illyes/MTI via AP)

    Attendees place pebbles atop a memorial tomb with the words 'Son of Man, shall these bones revive?' engraved on it during the burial service of the remains of Jewish people found in River Danube in the Kozma Street Jewish Cemetery in Budapest, Hungary, Friday, April 15, 2016. Human remains found in 2011, including many believed to be of Jews shot on the banks of the Danube River near the end of World War II, were buried Friday in a Jewish cemetery in Budapest. Two wooden caskets containing hundreds of bone fragments were laid to rest according to Jewish customs in a ceremony attended by Christian clergy and government officials. (Tibor Illyes/MTI via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Rabbi of the Hungarian Autonomous Othodox Jewish Community Meir Chaim Gestetner delivers his speech during the burial service of the remains of Jewish people found in River Danube in the Kozma Street Jewish Cemetery in Budapest, Hungary, Friday, April 15, 2016. Human remains found in 2011, including many believed to be of Jews shot on the banks of the Danube River near the end of World War II, were buried Friday in a Jewish cemetery in Budapest. Two wooden caskets containing hundreds of bone fragments were laid to rest according to Jewish customs in a ceremony attended by Christian clergy and government officials.  (Tibor Illyes/MTI via AP)

    Rabbi of the Hungarian Autonomous Othodox Jewish Community Meir Chaim Gestetner delivers his speech during the burial service of the remains of Jewish people found in River Danube in the Kozma Street Jewish Cemetery in Budapest, Hungary, Friday, April 15, 2016. Human remains found in 2011, including many believed to be of Jews shot on the banks of the Danube River near the end of World War II, were buried Friday in a Jewish cemetery in Budapest. Two wooden caskets containing hundreds of bone fragments were laid to rest according to Jewish customs in a ceremony attended by Christian clergy and government officials. (Tibor Illyes/MTI via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Rabbi of the Hungarian Autonomous Othodox Jewish Community, Meir Chaim Gestetner, left, delivers his speech as Secretary General of the Hungarian Autonomous Othodox Jewish Community Tamas Paskesz interprets during the burial service of the remains of Jewish people found in River Danube in the Kozma Street Jewish Cemetery in Budapest, Hungary, Friday, Apr. 15, 2016.Human remains found in 2011, including many believed to be of Jews shot on the banks of the Danube River near the end of World War II, were buried Friday in a Jewish cemetery in Budapest.  (Tibor Illyes/MTI via AP)

    Rabbi of the Hungarian Autonomous Othodox Jewish Community, Meir Chaim Gestetner, left, delivers his speech as Secretary General of the Hungarian Autonomous Othodox Jewish Community Tamas Paskesz interprets during the burial service of the remains of Jewish people found in River Danube in the Kozma Street Jewish Cemetery in Budapest, Hungary, Friday, Apr. 15, 2016.Human remains found in 2011, including many believed to be of Jews shot on the banks of the Danube River near the end of World War II, were buried Friday in a Jewish cemetery in Budapest. (Tibor Illyes/MTI via AP)  (The Associated Press)

Human remains found in 2011, including many believed to be of Jews shot on the banks of the Danube River near the end of World War II, have been buried in a Jewish cemetery in Budapest.

Two wooden caskets containing hundreds of bone fragments were laid to rest Friday according to Jewish customs in a ceremony attended by Christian clergy and government officials.

The remains were found during the renovation of Margit Bridge.

Andras Heiszler, president of the Federation of Hungarian Jewish Communities, says it is "the first and only case in 70 years" of bones believed to be of Hungarian Holocaust victims being found and buried.

Friday's burial took place on the eve of Hungary's Holocaust memorial day

DNA testing found many bones had markers characteristic of Ashkenazi Jews.