Europe

Spain: Podemos leader ready to give up power for new gov't

  • Spain's Socialist Party leader Pedro Sanchez, left, shakes hands with Podemos Party leader Pablo Iglesias for the media as they arrive to the Spanish Parliament before their meeting in Madrid, Wednesday, March 30, 2016. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

    Spain's Socialist Party leader Pedro Sanchez, left, shakes hands with Podemos Party leader Pablo Iglesias for the media as they arrive to the Spanish Parliament before their meeting in Madrid, Wednesday, March 30, 2016. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)  (The Associated Press)

  • Spain's Socialist Party leader Pedro Sanchez talks to journalists during a news conference following his meeting with Podemos Party leader Pablo Iglesias at the Spanish parliament in Madrid, Wednesday, March 30, 2016. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

    Spain's Socialist Party leader Pedro Sanchez talks to journalists during a news conference following his meeting with Podemos Party leader Pablo Iglesias at the Spanish parliament in Madrid, Wednesday, March 30, 2016. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)  (The Associated Press)

  • Spain's Podemos Party leader Pablo Iglesias listens to a question during a news conference following his meeting with Socialist Party leader Pedro Sanchez at the Spanish parliament in Madrid, Wednesday, March 30, 2016. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

    Spain's Podemos Party leader Pablo Iglesias listens to a question during a news conference following his meeting with Socialist Party leader Pedro Sanchez at the Spanish parliament in Madrid, Wednesday, March 30, 2016. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)  (The Associated Press)

Spain's far left Podemos party leader Pablo Iglesias says he's prepared to give up his demand for the No. 2 government job in a deal to form a government with the center-left Socialist Party.

Iglesias made the declaration Wednesday after meeting with Socialist leader Pedro Sanchez in an attempt to break a three-month political deadlock following Spain's inconclusive Dec. 20 election.

Iglesias now says the deputy prime minister job could go to someone else from Podemos.

The Socialists have already made a deal with the business-friendly Ciudadanos party but need Podemos* support.

The conservative Popular Party won the most votes but did not retain its 2011-2015 parliamentary majority.

The Socialists were second, Podemos was third and Ciudadanos came fourth.

None of the three will ally with the Popular Party.