World

Paris: Chilean, Mexican nationals among first confirmed victims killed in terror attacks

  • A mourner signs a makeshift memorial for the victim of the attacks in Paris in New York's Washington Square park, Saturday, Nov. 14, 2015. Multiple attacks across Paris on Friday night have left scores dead and hundreds injured. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

    A mourner signs a makeshift memorial for the victim of the attacks in Paris in New York's Washington Square park, Saturday, Nov. 14, 2015. Multiple attacks across Paris on Friday night have left scores dead and hundreds injured. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

  • A person pauses after placing flowers outside the gates of the French Embassy in Washington, Saturday, Nov. 14, 2015, following deadly attacks in Paris on Friday. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

    A person pauses after placing flowers outside the gates of the French Embassy in Washington, Saturday, Nov. 14, 2015, following deadly attacks in Paris on Friday. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Two days after one the Paris' worst terrorist attacks in history, the names of victims have slowly started to trickle out.

On Saturday, Mexico's foreign ministry confirmed that two Mexican women with dual nationalities were among at least 129 people killed in the gun and suicide bombing attacks in the French capital.

In a statement, the ministry said one of the women also held a Spanish passport, while the other held a dual U.S-Mexico citizenship. However, they did not provide their identities.

Reuters reported that the U.S. passport holder was the only American confirmed dead so far - 23-year-old Nohemi Gonzalez, who is has been the only American confirmed dead.

Gonzalez, who was studying aboard at Strate College of Design in France, was dining with fellow Cal State Long Beach students at a Paris restaurant when she was killed. She was taken away on a stretcher but did not survive her injures.

"I and the entire campus are heartbroken to share this terrible news," said University President Jane Close Conoley.

Design professor Michael LaForte said Gonzalez stood out in the tight-knit department.

"Nohemi was something of a star in our department," LaForte said. "She was a shining star, and she brought joy, happiness, laughter to everybody she worked with and her students, her classmates. She functioned like a bit of a mentor to younger students."

The university was notified of her death by French school officials and confirmed the death with her parents, spokesman Michael Uhlenkamp said.

Javier Duarte, governor of Vezacruz, identified the second Mexican woman in a Twitter post as Michelli Gil Jaimez from the Gulf of Mexico port of Tuxpan.

A third Mexican citizen with dual Austrian nationality was injured in the attacks and was successfully operated on Saturday. The ministry said this person was in recovery.

Chile's foreign ministry reported three Chilean nationals were also killed in the attacks. A statement identified one of the dead as Luis Felipe Azchoche Valle, 33, who had been living in Paris for eight years with his French wife.

The ministry said Valle was killed at the Bataclan concert hall.

The other Chilean victims were Patrician San Martin Nuñez, 62, and her daughter Elsa Veronique Delplace San Martin, 35, who was born in France.

According to the ministry, the women were the niece and grandniece of Chile's ambassador to Mexico, Ricardo Nuñez, who told Chilean media that his relatives died at the concert hall.

Seven people were detained Sunday in Belgium in connection with deadly attacks in Paris as the city entered three days of mourning for the 129 people killed in the worst violence in France in decades.

Thousands of French troops were deployed and tourist sites stood shuttered in one of the most visited cities on Earth, while more details started to emerge about the investigation.

The Islamic State group claimed responsibility for Friday's gun and bomb attacks on a stadium, a concert hall and Paris cafes that also wounded 350 people, 99 of them seriously.

Three of the seven suicide bombers who died in the attacks were French citizens, as was at least one of the men arrested in neighboring Belgium suspected of links to the bloodshed.

A French police official confirmed that a suicide attacker identified by a skin sample was living in the Paris suburbs at the time of his death. A Belgian official said two of the seven people wired with suicide vests were French men living in Brussels, and among those arrested was another French citizen living in the Belgian capital.

The new information highlighted growing fears of homegrown terrorism in a country that has exported more jihadis than any other in Europe. All three gunmen in the January attacks on the Charlie Hebdo newspaper and a kosher supermarket were French.

Authorities said three teams of attackers were involved and seven suicide bombers blew themselves up -- three near the stadium and three at the concert hall and one not far from it.

Authorities have not said if there are more attackers at large.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Like us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter & Instagram