World

Portugal's new govt unveils its plans although it's likely doomed to a quick exit

  • Portuguese Prime Minister Pedro Passos Coelho delivers his speech opening the debate of the government's four-year policy program at the Parliament in Lisbon, Monday, Nov. 9, 2015. Together the left-of-center parties have 122 seats in the 230-seat Parliament, outnumbering the government, and have vowed to reject the program in a vote expected Tuesday. Such a defeat would force the government, which took office on Oct. 30, to resign, possibly opening the door for the unprecedented leftist alliance to take over. (AP Photo/Armando Franca)

    Portuguese Prime Minister Pedro Passos Coelho delivers his speech opening the debate of the government's four-year policy program at the Parliament in Lisbon, Monday, Nov. 9, 2015. Together the left-of-center parties have 122 seats in the 230-seat Parliament, outnumbering the government, and have vowed to reject the program in a vote expected Tuesday. Such a defeat would force the government, which took office on Oct. 30, to resign, possibly opening the door for the unprecedented leftist alliance to take over. (AP Photo/Armando Franca)  (The Associated Press)

  • Portuguese Prime Minister Pedro Passos Coelho, right, and Deputy Prime Minister Paulo Portas use telephones during the debate of the government's four-year policy program at the Parliament in Lisbon, Monday, Nov. 9 2015. Together the left-of-center parties have 122 seats in the 230-seat Parliament, outnumbering the government, and have vowed to reject the program in a vote expected Tuesday. Such a defeat would force the government, which took office on Oct. 30, to resign, possibly opening the door for the unprecedented leftist alliance to take over. (AP Photo/Armando Franca)

    Portuguese Prime Minister Pedro Passos Coelho, right, and Deputy Prime Minister Paulo Portas use telephones during the debate of the government's four-year policy program at the Parliament in Lisbon, Monday, Nov. 9 2015. Together the left-of-center parties have 122 seats in the 230-seat Parliament, outnumbering the government, and have vowed to reject the program in a vote expected Tuesday. Such a defeat would force the government, which took office on Oct. 30, to resign, possibly opening the door for the unprecedented leftist alliance to take over. (AP Photo/Armando Franca)  (The Associated Press)

Portugal's new prime minister is telling Parliament about his plans for the next four years, even though an unprecedented alliance of anti-austerity parties is poised to unseat his center-right government within 24 hours.

Prime Minister Pedro Passos Coelho opened a two-day debate Monday that's to conclude with a vote that could make his government the shortest ever. His coalition government was re-elected last month but lost its outright majority in Parliament.

The second-place Socialist Party has forged an alliance with the Communist Party and the radical Left Bloc to create a 122-seat majority in the 230-seat Parliament. Those parties want to reverse some cutbacks and reforms demanded by creditors following Portugal's 78 billion-euro ($84 billion) bailout in 2011 and have vowed to force the government's resignation.