World

Colombia's president apologizes for deadly siege of Supreme Court on 30th anniversary

  • Colombia's President Juan Manuel Santos speaks on the 30th anniversary of a deadly government siege at the rebuilt Palace of Justice in Bogota, Colombia, Friday, Nov. 6, 2015, behind photos of Supreme Court workers who disappeared during the attack. Santos apologized for his country’s actions during a 1985 army raid on the Supreme Court, acting in accordance with a ruling last year by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights condemning the state for the disappearance of 12 individuals, mostly cafeteria workers, who were taken alive from the building during the 48-hour standoff. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

    Colombia's President Juan Manuel Santos speaks on the 30th anniversary of a deadly government siege at the rebuilt Palace of Justice in Bogota, Colombia, Friday, Nov. 6, 2015, behind photos of Supreme Court workers who disappeared during the attack. Santos apologized for his country’s actions during a 1985 army raid on the Supreme Court, acting in accordance with a ruling last year by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights condemning the state for the disappearance of 12 individuals, mostly cafeteria workers, who were taken alive from the building during the 48-hour standoff. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)  (The Associated Press)

  • Colombia's President Juan Manuel Santos speaks on the 30th anniversary of a deadly government siege at the rebuilt Palace of Justice in Bogota, Colombia, Friday, Nov. 6, 2015, behind photos of Supreme Court workers who disappeared during the attack. Santos apologized for his country’s actions during a 1985 army raid on the Supreme Court, acting in accordance with a ruling last year by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights condemning the state for the disappearance of 12 individuals, mostly cafeteria workers, who were taken alive from the building during the 48-hour standoff. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

    Colombia's President Juan Manuel Santos speaks on the 30th anniversary of a deadly government siege at the rebuilt Palace of Justice in Bogota, Colombia, Friday, Nov. 6, 2015, behind photos of Supreme Court workers who disappeared during the attack. Santos apologized for his country’s actions during a 1985 army raid on the Supreme Court, acting in accordance with a ruling last year by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights condemning the state for the disappearance of 12 individuals, mostly cafeteria workers, who were taken alive from the building during the 48-hour standoff. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)  (The Associated Press)

  • Daughters of the late judge Carlos Uran address people attending a ceremony commemorating the 30th anniversary of a deadly government siege, at the rebuilt Palace of Justice in Bogota, Colombia, Friday, Nov. 6, 2015. Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos apologized for his country’s actions during a 1985 army raid on the Supreme Court, acting in accordance with a ruling last year by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights condemning the state for the disappearance of 12 individuals, mostly cafeteria workers, who were taken alive from the building during the 48-hour standoff. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

    Daughters of the late judge Carlos Uran address people attending a ceremony commemorating the 30th anniversary of a deadly government siege, at the rebuilt Palace of Justice in Bogota, Colombia, Friday, Nov. 6, 2015. Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos apologized for his country’s actions during a 1985 army raid on the Supreme Court, acting in accordance with a ruling last year by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights condemning the state for the disappearance of 12 individuals, mostly cafeteria workers, who were taken alive from the building during the 48-hour standoff. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)  (The Associated Press)

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos is apologizing for his country's actions during a 1985 army raid on the Supreme Court in which nearly 100 people were killed after the building was taken hostage by guerrillas.

Santos' apology came Friday at the rebuilt Palace of Justice, at a ceremony to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the deadly siege.

He was acting in accordance with a ruling last year by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights condemning the state for the disappearance of 12 individuals, mostly cafeteria workers, who were taken alive from the building during the 48-hour standoff.

Rebels from the now-defunct leftist insurgency known as M-19 took the high court hostage Nov. 6, 1985, with the aim of putting then-President Belisario Betancur on trial.