World

Turkish parties rally ahead of Sunday's crucial parliamentary vote

  • In this Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015 photo made available Friday,Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan salutes from a balcony his supporters, who are barely visible, gathered outside the gates of his vast presidential palace on Republic Day in Ankara, Turkey. Critics accuse Erdogan of organizing rallies in Turkey and Europe to drum up votes for the ruling Justice and Development Party ahead of Sunday general elections, in breach of laws that require him to be neutral.(AP Photo/Presidential Press Service, Pool )

    In this Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015 photo made available Friday,Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan salutes from a balcony his supporters, who are barely visible, gathered outside the gates of his vast presidential palace on Republic Day in Ankara, Turkey. Critics accuse Erdogan of organizing rallies in Turkey and Europe to drum up votes for the ruling Justice and Development Party ahead of Sunday general elections, in breach of laws that require him to be neutral.(AP Photo/Presidential Press Service, Pool )  (The Associated Press)

  • In this Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015 photo made available Friday,Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who is barely visible, salutes from a balcony his supporters walking on a main road with national flags outside the gates of his vast presidential palace on Republic Day in Ankara, Turkey. Critics accuse Erdogan of organizing rallies in Turkey and Europe to drum up votes for the ruling Justice and Development Party ahead of Sunday general elections, in breach of laws that require him to be neutral.(AP Photo/Presidential Press Service, Pool )

    In this Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015 photo made available Friday,Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who is barely visible, salutes from a balcony his supporters walking on a main road with national flags outside the gates of his vast presidential palace on Republic Day in Ankara, Turkey. Critics accuse Erdogan of organizing rallies in Turkey and Europe to drum up votes for the ruling Justice and Development Party ahead of Sunday general elections, in breach of laws that require him to be neutral.(AP Photo/Presidential Press Service, Pool )  (The Associated Press)

  • Selahattin Demirtas, co-chair of the pro-Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party, (HDP), speaks during a press conference ahead of the Nov. 1 general elections, at Ozgur radio station in Istanbul, Turkey, Friday, Oct. 30, 2015. The election is a redo of June elections in which the ruling Justice and Development Party, or AKP, stunningly lost its majority. The ballot comes at a sensitive time for Turkey, a key Western ally that has major issues to navigate. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)

    Selahattin Demirtas, co-chair of the pro-Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party, (HDP), speaks during a press conference ahead of the Nov. 1 general elections, at Ozgur radio station in Istanbul, Turkey, Friday, Oct. 30, 2015. The election is a redo of June elections in which the ruling Justice and Development Party, or AKP, stunningly lost its majority. The ballot comes at a sensitive time for Turkey, a key Western ally that has major issues to navigate. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)  (The Associated Press)

Turkish political parties are making their closing appeals ahead of Sunday's crucial parliamentary vote.

The election is a redo of June elections in which the ruling Justice and Development Party, or AKP, lost its majority after 13 years of single-party rule. As he seeks a rebound, Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu was campaigning in his home city of Konya on Friday.

With the country gripped by violence, he emphasized security at home.

"We will one by one defeat the terror and the negative reflection of the conflict in the region," he said, as supporters chanted "Alone!" in support of the party ruling without a partner.

The main secularist opposition leader, Kemal Kilicdaroglu, campaigning in his party's stronghold Izmir, promised to restore Turkey's relations with neighbors and the Arab world.