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German Parliament expected to pass key vote on Greece bailout despite some opposition

  • German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble waits for the beginning of a meeting of the Christian Democratic Party's parliamentary faction on the eve of Wednesday's vote on another bailout package for Greece, in the German Bundestag in Berlin, Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015. (AP Photo/Ferdinand Ostrop)

    German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble waits for the beginning of a meeting of the Christian Democratic Party's parliamentary faction on the eve of Wednesday's vote on another bailout package for Greece, in the German Bundestag in Berlin, Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015. (AP Photo/Ferdinand Ostrop)  (The Associated Press)

  • German Chancellor Angela Merkel, center, stands between lawmakers after she casts her vote on a bailout package for Greece, in the German parliament Bundestag in Berlin, Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber).

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel, center, stands between lawmakers after she casts her vote on a bailout package for Greece, in the German parliament Bundestag in Berlin, Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber).  (The Associated Press)

  • German Chancellor Angela Merkel attends a debate at the German parliament prior to a vote on another bailout package for Greece, in the German Bundestag in Berlin, Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber).

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel attends a debate at the German parliament prior to a vote on another bailout package for Greece, in the German Bundestag in Berlin, Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber).  (The Associated Press)

The German Parliament is expected to approve another bailout package for Greece with overwhelming support, despite misgivings among some conservative lawmakers.

Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble, a senior member of Chancellor Angela Merkel's Christian Democratic Party, will present the government's argument Wednesday for the 86 billion euro ($93 billion) bailout package for Greece.

Germany is the largest single contributor to the bailouts and many conservatives are skeptical about a third bailout for Greece.

Media have reported that in a test vote late Tuesday 60 of 311 conservative lawmakers voted no or abstained — fewer than had been speculated would say no.

In a similar vote last month, 60 members of the caucus voting no.

The deal is also supported by Merkel's coalition partner, the Social Democrats, and the opposition Greens.