GLOBAL ECONOMY

Uber taxi rolls out Spanish-language service in three U.S. cities

BERLIN, GERMANY - SEPTEMBER 02:  In this photo illustration, a woman uses the Uber app on an Samsung smartphone on September 2, 2014 in Berlin, Germany. Uber, an app that allows passenger to buy rides from drivers who do not have taxi permits, has had its UberPop freelance driver service banned in Germany after a complaint by Taxi Deutschland, a trade association of taxi drivers in the country. The company, which operates in 42 countries over 200 cities worldwide, plans to both appeal the decision made by a court in Frankfurt as well as, at the risk of heavy fines, continue its services in Germany until a final decision has been made on the matter.  (Photo by Adam Berry/Getty Images)

BERLIN, GERMANY - SEPTEMBER 02: In this photo illustration, a woman uses the Uber app on an Samsung smartphone on September 2, 2014 in Berlin, Germany. Uber, an app that allows passenger to buy rides from drivers who do not have taxi permits, has had its UberPop freelance driver service banned in Germany after a complaint by Taxi Deutschland, a trade association of taxi drivers in the country. The company, which operates in 42 countries over 200 cities worldwide, plans to both appeal the decision made by a court in Frankfurt as well as, at the risk of heavy fines, continue its services in Germany until a final decision has been made on the matter. (Photo by Adam Berry/Getty Images)  (2014 Getty Images)

A popular and controversial ride-sharing app in the U.S. will now be asking: ¿A dónde quieres ir?

Uber introduced UberEspañol this week, a service that allows customers to select a Spanish-speaking driver. The service is being made available in Phoenix, Tucson and San Diego.

“Uber is here to connect anyone, anywhere with a safe, reliable and affordable ride – while making it all as convenient as possible,” the company wrote on its website.

“We have heard from riders and driver-partners alike — they’d like the Uber experience to reflect the multilingual aspects of these multicultural communities.”

According to the United States Census Bureau, over 40 percent of Tucson’s population is Hispanic. Some think UberEspañol is long overdue in the city.

"I think UberEspañol would be a wonderful thing for Tucson given the fact that there are so many Spanish speakers here," resident James Phillip told Fox News Latino.

The San Francisco-based company has made headlines in the past, stirring debates on regulation and safety codes in the ride-sharing industry, both in the U.S. and abroad.

The revelation earlier this week that 50,000 Uber drivers’ personal information had been hacked also has brought the controversial company negative attention.

Aalia Shaheed is part of the Junior Reporter program at Fox News. Get more information on the program here and follow them on Twitter: @FNCJrReporters