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Protesters mark 4 months since students disappeared in southern Mexico, doubt official account

  • A protestor carries a hanging mask of Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto marked with the word in Spanish "Assassin" during a march in Mexico City, Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. Protest marches were planned in cities around the country to mark the fourth month since the disappearance of 43 students in southern Guerrero state. The federal prosecutor has said the students were detained by local police and handed over to a drug gang, who killed them and burned their bodies. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

    A protestor carries a hanging mask of Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto marked with the word in Spanish "Assassin" during a march in Mexico City, Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. Protest marches were planned in cities around the country to mark the fourth month since the disappearance of 43 students in southern Guerrero state. The federal prosecutor has said the students were detained by local police and handed over to a drug gang, who killed them and burned their bodies. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)  (The Associated Press)

  • Masks in the likeness of Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto, right, and former President Carlos Salinas, covered with the Spanish word "Assassin," sit next to a sign during a protest against the disappearance of 43 students from a rural teachers college in Guerrero state on the fourth month since they went missing, in Mexico City, Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. The sign reads in Spanish "Ayotzinapa will never be forgotten. I don't plan on getting over it. May it be clear "Enrique Pena Nieto," four months." The federal prosecutor has said the students were detained by local police and handed over to a drug gang, who killed them and burned their bodies. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)

    Masks in the likeness of Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto, right, and former President Carlos Salinas, covered with the Spanish word "Assassin," sit next to a sign during a protest against the disappearance of 43 students from a rural teachers college in Guerrero state on the fourth month since they went missing, in Mexico City, Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. The sign reads in Spanish "Ayotzinapa will never be forgotten. I don't plan on getting over it. May it be clear "Enrique Pena Nieto," four months." The federal prosecutor has said the students were detained by local police and handed over to a drug gang, who killed them and burned their bodies. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)  (The Associated Press)

  • Protestors carry banners with pictures of some of the 43 missing students from a rural teachers college, as they march along a main boulevard in Mexico City, Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. The banner of Israel Caballero Sanchez reads "My desire was to study and not to be a victim of violence," and "They took them alive. We want them back alive." Protest marches were planned in cities around the country to mark the fourth month since the disappearance of the students in southern Guerrero state. The federal prosecutor has said the students were detained by local police and handed over to a drug gang, who killed them and burned their bodies.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

    Protestors carry banners with pictures of some of the 43 missing students from a rural teachers college, as they march along a main boulevard in Mexico City, Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. The banner of Israel Caballero Sanchez reads "My desire was to study and not to be a victim of violence," and "They took them alive. We want them back alive." Protest marches were planned in cities around the country to mark the fourth month since the disappearance of the students in southern Guerrero state. The federal prosecutor has said the students were detained by local police and handed over to a drug gang, who killed them and burned their bodies.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)  (The Associated Press)

Protesters in Mexico City are marking four months since the disappearance of 43 rural teachers' college students in southern Mexico.

Demonstrators streamed through the streets from four starting points to converge at the capital's massive main square, the Zocalo. They brandished portraits of the missing, and signs demanding their return along with punishment for those responsible.

Prosecutors have said police kidnapped the students on Sept. 26 in the southern state of Guerrero and handed them over to drug gang members, who killed them and burned the bodies.

Protesters said Monday the government has failed to clear up doubts.

Student Omar Garcia says "there is no proof that convinces us that it happened like that."