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Prepping For Zombie Apocalypse: Gang Member Claims Guns Were For Zombie Attack

ALAMEDA DE LA SAGRA, SPAIN - DECEMBER 01:  Zombies walk the streets during Zombie Survival contest on December 1, 2013 in Alameda de la Sagra, near Toledo, Spain. 'Zombie Survival' is a contest taking place all around Alameda de la Sagra where participants have to avoid getting touched by Zombies and find all clues to survive. The winners will leave the village by helicopter.  (Photo by Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)

ALAMEDA DE LA SAGRA, SPAIN - DECEMBER 01: Zombies walk the streets during Zombie Survival contest on December 1, 2013 in Alameda de la Sagra, near Toledo, Spain. 'Zombie Survival' is a contest taking place all around Alameda de la Sagra where participants have to avoid getting touched by Zombies and find all clues to survive. The winners will leave the village by helicopter. (Photo by Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)  (2013 Getty Images)

If there is one thing that "The Walking Dead," "World War Z" and the slew of other zombie-related TV shows and films have recently taught us is that a person’s day can go from mundane to a post-apocalyptic nightmare in a matter of seconds.

A person, the movies show, is unprepared for the onslaught of flesh-eating undead and bands of armed surviving humans trying to survive in a crashed society.

Fearing this type of scenario besieging the New York City area, one Latin Kings' member on Staten Island wasn’t going to let the hungry horde of zombies tear apart his homies.

When the Staten Island Gang Squad raided his home last week and found two loaded pistols, a .40 caliber Springfield Armory XD40 and a .25 caliber American Firearms Mfg. inside his apartment, Nelson Quinones, 42, told cops he was worried about a “doomsday” and the “zombie apocalypse.”

“He legitimately told the cops that,” a source told The New Post. “He was serious.”

When police entered the bedroom of Quinones’ apartment, they found his girlfriend, Meritza Hay, in the residence along with the weapons. Then the zombie hunter became the hunted when cops tracked down Quinones in the parking lot behind his home, where he was wielding a gravity knife – a switchblade-type of knife that is illegal in New York City.

When questioned by police about his profession, Quinones told detectives he was a professional tree climber, while his girlfriend said that he “flies kites” for a living.

Quinones was released Monday on $20,000 bail and faces charges on criminal possession of a weapon, criminal possession of a firearm, and possession of ammunition.

Besides the popularity of zombie-related media on the market today, the fascination with the so-called “zombie apocalypse” spiked after the May 2012 incident when a naked Florida man – high on a drug called bath salts – attacked a homeless man in Miami and munched on his face.

The Center for Disease Control tried to reassure concerned citizens and said that the CDC “does not know of a virus or condition that would reanimate the dead (or one that would present zombie-like symptoms),” said spokesman David Daigle.

But then, isn’t that how it always begins…

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