Europe

Not much brain needed to be a rock star, says Jagger

Rolling Stones singer Mick Jagger performs with his band at The Honda Center in Anaheim, California on May 15, 2013. Jagger admitted on Friday he has found his career in the Rolling Stones "intellectually undemanding" and sometimes wishes he had stuck to his original idea of becoming a teacher.

Rolling Stones singer Mick Jagger performs with his band at The Honda Center in Anaheim, California on May 15, 2013. Jagger admitted on Friday he has found his career in the Rolling Stones "intellectually undemanding" and sometimes wishes he had stuck to his original idea of becoming a teacher.  (Getty Images/AFP/File)

Mick Jagger admitted on Friday he has found his career in the Rolling Stones "intellectually undemanding" and sometimes wishes he had stuck to his original idea of becoming a teacher.

Jagger, who will front the Stones in their first ever appearance at Britain's Glastonbury festival on Saturday, said he had considered other career options such as being a journalist or a dancer, although that would have involved "too many injuries".

The 69-year-old, who was still a student at the London School of Economics when the Stones were starting out, said in a BBC interview: "A schoolteacher would have been very gratifying, I'm sure.

"There are millions of things you would have loved to have done, a politician, a journalist... I thought of being a journalist once.

"All these things you think of when you're a teenager, you can think, well, I would have liked to have done that but that's completely pointless," he added.

"But I don't feel frustrated for a lack of control at all and I'm very pleased with what I've done.

"Everyone wants to have done more things in their lives. It is a slightly intellectually undemanding thing to do, being a rock singer, but, you know, you make the best of it."

...,/.,