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Mexico Says Migration Exodus Has Fallen to 'Almost Nothing'

NOGALES, AZ - JUNE 02:  A fence separates the cities of Nogales, Arizona (L) and Nogales, Sonora Mexico, a frequent crossing point for people entering the United States illegally, June 2, 2010 in Nogales, Arizona.  During the 2009 fiscal year 540,865 undocumented immigrants were apprehended entering the United States illegally along the Mexican border, 241,000 of those were captured in the 262 mile stretch of the border known as the Tucson Sector.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

NOGALES, AZ - JUNE 02: A fence separates the cities of Nogales, Arizona (L) and Nogales, Sonora Mexico, a frequent crossing point for people entering the United States illegally, June 2, 2010 in Nogales, Arizona. During the 2009 fiscal year 540,865 undocumented immigrants were apprehended entering the United States illegally along the Mexican border, 241,000 of those were captured in the 262 mile stretch of the border known as the Tucson Sector. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)  (2010 Getty Images)

Fewer migrants are entering Mexico, but the number leaving has dropped even faster.

Less than 1 percent of Mexico's population has left the country in the last year, according to the government. The Mexican government's statistical unit says the country's net outflow of migrants has fallen to "almost nothing." 

The National Statistics Institute says Mexico lost about 0.09 percent of its population to migration as of March 2010 and March 2011.

About 0.38 percent of the country's 112.7 million people migrated abroad, while about 0.29 percent immigrated to Mexico.

The Institute said Monday the net loss was down from the outflow of 0.53 percent when the comparison was first made at the height of the migration boom in 2006.

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The comparisons are based on preliminary figures from the quarterly National Employment and Occupation survey.

Based on reporting by the Associated Press.

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