World

Miners Go Mum in Search of Payday

Rescued miner Carlos Mamani, from Bolivia, is surrounded by the press as he arrives to his home in Copiapo, Chile, Thursday Oct. 14, 2010.  Rescued miners are beginning to return to their homes while some remain in the hospital for observation.  (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Rescued miner Carlos Mamani, from Bolivia, is surrounded by the press as he arrives to his home in Copiapo, Chile, Thursday Oct. 14, 2010. Rescued miners are beginning to return to their homes while some remain in the hospital for observation. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

It could be the most closely guarded and expensive story in the world right now.

The 33 Chilean miners had more than enough time to think about how they were going to handle their new stardom, and it appears they have a plan. News organizations are reporting that the heroic 33 are closely guarding their story in an attempt to fairly divide the spoils of their new stardom.

The first three rescued Chilean miners were released from the hospital Friday but remained tight lipped, providing no dramatic details of their 69 days trapped a half mile beneath the Atacama desert.

A daughter of Omar Reygadas, a 56-year-old electrician, said in an interview early Friday that her father told her just hours earlier that the miners have agreed to divide all their earnings from interviews, media appearances, movies or books.

"He also said we can't say things to the media without their permission," said Ximena Alejandra Reygadas, 37. "He said they need to decide what we can tell the media."

The Associated Press reported that the drama above the ground had been brewing throughout the 69 days as jealousy amongst family members quickly turned to rivalry.

The Associated Press contributed to this article.