DISASTERS

Superstorm Sandy: A year later

One year after the massive storm rocked the East Coast on Oct. 29, 2012, homeowners, businesses and entire neighborhoods continue to rebuild in the aftermath of Sandy, which reportedly caused damage in excess of $68 billion.

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In this combination of Monday, Feb. 25, 2013 and Sunday, Oct. 13, 2013 photos, the sun rises in Seaside Heights, N.J., behind the Jet Star Roller Coaster which had been sitting in the ocean after part of the Casino Pier was destroyed during Superstorm Sandy, and the empty site nearly a year after the storm. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

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This combination of Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012 and Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 photos shows commuters in a line which stretched twice around the arena waiting to board buses into Manhattan in front of the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, New York and the site nearly a year later. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

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This combination of photos from Dec. 4, 2012 and Oct. 21, 2013 show the ruins of more than 100 homes in the Breezy Point section of the Queens borough of New York following Superstorm Sandy and new construction to replace them. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

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This combination of Oct. 29, 2012 and Oct. 20, 2013 photos shows sea water flooding the entrance to the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel in New York as Superstorm Sandy struck the city, and traffic entering nearly a year later. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

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This combination of Thursday, Nov. 22, 2012 and Sunday, Oct. 13, 2013 photos shows debris left by Superstorm Sandy where the boardwalk had been in front of Lucky Leo's arcade in Seaside Heights, N.J. and people walking at the rebuilt area nearly a year later. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

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This combination of Oct. 29, 2012 and Oct. 17, 2013 photos shows a darkened lower Manhattan during Superstorm Sandy as seen from the Brooklyn Heights promenade in the Brooklyn borough of New York and the same view nearly a year later. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

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FILE - In this Sept. 27, 2013 file photo, Gigi Liaguno-Dorr, owner of Jakeabob's Off The Bay restaurant in Union Beach, N.J., is interiewed in her temporary eatery, replacing the one that was destroyed the previous October by Superstorm Sandy. The tables and wall panels in her temporary restaurant are front doors that were reclaimed from Union Beach homes destroyed by the storm. She needs $2 million to rebuild the bayfront restaurant that was one of the town's major employers, but has come up with less than a quarter of that. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry, File)

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This Monday, Oct. 21, 2013 photo shows reinforced dunes and the buried remains of the former boardwalk along a beach in the Rockaway neighborhood in the borough of Queens, New York. A year after Superstorm Sandy, New York Citys submerged subways and tunnels sprang back to life with surprising speed. Beach boardwalks were rebuilt and mountains of debris were removed. And while some beach towns quickly rebuilt their seaside promenades and beaches, for every success story, there are tales of continuing frustration. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

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Young women wade into the ocean to release lanterns with handwritten personal messages on them during a beachside ceremony "Rockaways Rising: Hands Across the Sand," commemorating the one year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy, Sunday, Oct. 27, 2013, in New York. The actual one year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy is Tuesday, Oct. 29. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

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People line up along the beach during "Rockaways Rising: Hands Across the Sand," a beachside ceremony commemorating the one year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy, Sunday, Oct. 27, 2013, in New York. The actual one year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy is Tuesday, Oct. 29. In the event, thousands of people held hands on the beach in the Rockaways where nearly a year ago Superstorm Sandy washed ashore. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

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In this Oct. 2, 2013 photo, algae fills the swimming pool behind Joe Monte's Oakwood Beach house in the Staten Island borough of New York, nearly a year after Superstorm Sandy ravaged the neighborhood, killing some residents and sending others fleeing for their lives. Oakwood Beach is the first and only Sandy-damaged neighborhood in New York City to be completely bought out under a state program that selects the most damaged flood-prone communities and offers residents the full, pre-storm value of their homes. The (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

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In this Oct. 2, 2013 photo, Oakwood Beach property owner Joseph Tirone surveys a creek that flooded it's banks nearly a year ago when Superstorm Sandy ravaged his low-lying neighborhood on Staten Island's Southeastern shore, in New York. Oakwood Beach is the first and only Sandy-damaged neighborhood in New York City to be completely bought out under a state program that selects the most damaged flood-prone communities and offers residents the full, pre-storm value of their homes. The city has a program of its own but has only acquired one property so far. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

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In this Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2013 photo, long-time Staten Island homeowner Joe Monte reflects on why he abandoned his Oakwood Beach dream house after it was severely damaged nearly a year ago when storm surge from Superstorm Sandy ravaged the neighborhood in New York. Traumatized by what the storm did to his home, Monte says the storm saved his life and returning the area to nature will give him some solace over what was lost. Monte is among about 400 homeowners awaiting state buyouts so they can move on with their lives and rebuild in less vulnerable areas. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

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In this Oct. 2, 2013 photo, a tire hangs from a tree in an abandoned section of the Oakwood Beach neighborhood of Staten Island, in New York, where only the foundations of homes remain nearly one year after Superstorm Sandy devastated the area. The forces of nature had been threatening the neighborhood for years, flooding the streets every time it rained and swamping bungalows so regularly that it was just accepted as part of life. But when Superstorm Sandy swept in and killed three residents, the state decided to buy 400 homes, bulldoze them and convert the whole area into green space. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

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In this Oct. 22, 2013 photo, Jose Figueiredo holds a stick while crossing Route 35 in Ortley Beach, N.J. A year ago, the road was covered in beach sand and debris after Superstorm Sandy hit the area. The storm caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

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In this Friday, Oct. 18, 2013 photo, Barbara Rubine looks out over a marsh in Cranston, R.I. Rubine and other residents of the Edgewood neighborhood have planted grasses and shrubs near the shore in an attempt to prevent erosion and damage from coastal storms. Rhode Island is looking for 1,000 volunteers to help plant dune grass lost to Superstorm Sandy along the states southern shore. (AP Photo/David Klepper)

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A sign counting the days since Superstorm Sandy destroyed thirty homes in Ocean Breeze rests on the front of a trailer serving as a temporary storage area on Quincy Avenue near Staten Island's southeastern shore, Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2013, in New York. Sandwiched between a salt water creek and the ocean, the low-lying area was vulnerable when storm surge from Superstorm Sandy roared ashore submerging area streets and homes. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

Superstorm Sandy: A year later

One year after the massive storm rocked the East Coast on Oct. 29, 2012, homeowners, businesses and entire neighborhoods continue to rebuild in the aftermath of Sandy, which reportedly caused damage in excess of $68 billion.

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