South Carolina

A look at US police encounters resulting in black deaths

  • FILE - In this Dec. 1, 2014 file photo, Tomiko Shine holds up a picture of Tamir Rice, the 12 year old boy fatally shot by a rookie police officer in Cleveland, Ohio, on Nov. 22, during a protest in Washington, D.C. Twelve-year-old Tamir Rice was fatally shot by a Cleveland police officer near a gazebo in a recreational area in November 2014. Officers were responding to a report of a man waving a gun. The boy, who had a pellet gun tucked in his waistband, was shot right after their cruiser skidded to a stop a few feet away. A grand jury in December 2015 declined to indict patrolman Timothy Loehmann, who fired the fatal shot, and training officer Frank Garmback. The city in 2016 agreed to settle a federal lawsuit filed by Tamir Rice’s family for $6 million. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

    FILE - In this Dec. 1, 2014 file photo, Tomiko Shine holds up a picture of Tamir Rice, the 12 year old boy fatally shot by a rookie police officer in Cleveland, Ohio, on Nov. 22, during a protest in Washington, D.C. Twelve-year-old Tamir Rice was fatally shot by a Cleveland police officer near a gazebo in a recreational area in November 2014. Officers were responding to a report of a man waving a gun. The boy, who had a pellet gun tucked in his waistband, was shot right after their cruiser skidded to a stop a few feet away. A grand jury in December 2015 declined to indict patrolman Timothy Loehmann, who fired the fatal shot, and training officer Frank Garmback. The city in 2016 agreed to settle a federal lawsuit filed by Tamir Rice’s family for $6 million. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this July 7, 2015, file photo, Gwen Carr holds a picture of her son Eric Garner during a news conference in New York with relatives of New Yorkers killed by police. died in July 2014 in New York City after a white officer placed him in a chokehold during an arrest for selling loose cigarettes. A grand jury declined to indict the officer who put Garner in the hold or any of the other officers involved in the arrest. The city agreed to pay a $6 million civil settlement. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

    FILE - In this July 7, 2015, file photo, Gwen Carr holds a picture of her son Eric Garner during a news conference in New York with relatives of New Yorkers killed by police. died in July 2014 in New York City after a white officer placed him in a chokehold during an arrest for selling loose cigarettes. A grand jury declined to indict the officer who put Garner in the hold or any of the other officers involved in the arrest. The city agreed to pay a $6 million civil settlement. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In a Dec. 16, 2015 file photo, Jazmin Holloway sits below a mural depicting Freddie Gray at the intersection of his arrest, in Baltimore. The first effort to find a police officer criminally responsible for Freddie Gray's death from a broken neck in a police van ended Wednesday with a hung jury and a mistrial. Gray's death led to rioting. Prosecutors in July 2016 said they were dropping charges against the remaining police officers awaiting trial, leaving no convictions against six officers who were charged initially in the case. Gray’s family agreed to a $6.4 million settlement with the city in September 2015.(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

    FILE - In a Dec. 16, 2015 file photo, Jazmin Holloway sits below a mural depicting Freddie Gray at the intersection of his arrest, in Baltimore. The first effort to find a police officer criminally responsible for Freddie Gray's death from a broken neck in a police van ended Wednesday with a hung jury and a mistrial. Gray's death led to rioting. Prosecutors in July 2016 said they were dropping charges against the remaining police officers awaiting trial, leaving no convictions against six officers who were charged initially in the case. Gray’s family agreed to a $6.4 million settlement with the city in September 2015.(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)  (The Associated Press)

The police slayings of two black men after traffic stops are the focus of murder trials unfolding in two cities. They also are among a series of cases across the country that have raised a national debate over race and policing.

Former University of Cincinnati officer Ray Tensing is on trial in the 2015 fatal shooting of 43-year-old Sam DuBose. Former North Charleston, South Carolina, officer Michael Slager is on trial in the April 2015 shooting of 50-year-old Walter Scott. Both former officers are white.

Other cases of the deaths of blacks after police encounters range from the fatal shooting of a 12-year-old boy in a Cleveland recreation area in November 2014 to that of a 66-year-old woman in her Bronx, New York, apartment last month.