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The Latest: Trump says police hamstrung in terrorism fight

  • Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally, Saturday, Sept. 17, 2016, in Colorado Springs, Colo. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

    Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally, Saturday, Sept. 17, 2016, in Colorado Springs, Colo. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)  (The Associated Press)

  • Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, left, listens to Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, right, during a meeting at the Lotte New York Palace hotel in New York, Monday, Sept. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)

    Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, left, listens to Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, right, during a meeting at the Lotte New York Palace hotel in New York, Monday, Sept. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)  (The Associated Press)

  • Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko, right, shakes hands with Clinton campaign chair John Podesta, left, as Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton watches in New York, Monday, Sept. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

    Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko, right, shakes hands with Clinton campaign chair John Podesta, left, as Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton watches in New York, Monday, Sept. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)  (The Associated Press)

The Latest on the U.S. presidential race (all times EDT):

8:25 a.m.

Donald Trump says police "are afraid to do anything" to stop attacks like the bombing in New York because they don't want to be accused of racial profiling.

In a phone interview Monday on "Fox and Friends," the Republican presidential nominee said he would "knock the hell out of" terrorist groups.

A weekend explosion in Manhattan injured 29 people.

Trump said local police often know who "a lot of these people are" but "they are afraid to do anything about it because they don't want to be accused of profiling."

Trump also repeated his call to crack down on immigration, a central theme of his campaign.

He said: "This isn't just something that I developed overnight" because of the attacks. "I knew this was going to happen," he added.

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5:50 a.m.

Hillary Clinton is wooing younger voters in Philadelphia as her campaign acknowledges they need to do more to get millennials on board.

Campaign communications director Jennifer Palmieri says Clinton will use the Monday morning event at Temple University to "speak directly to millennial voters about how they have the most at stake in this election." She added that the campaign recognizes younger voters are a key demographic and "it's clear that the campaign must do more to earn their vote."

Palmieri noted the campaign has increased efforts to reach out to young voters. They are sending out popular surrogates like President Barack Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama, Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Sen. Bernie Sanders. She says the campaign is also working in the states to organize and mobilize younger voters.