New York

Newly found blood vials allow for funeral of 9/11 fire chief

  • Theresa Stack holds the helmet of her husband, FDNY Battalion Chief Lawrence Stack, following his funeral on Friday, June 17, 2016, in St. James, N.Y. Friday would have been the couple's 49th wedding anniversary. Stack died in the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Frank Eltman)

    Theresa Stack holds the helmet of her husband, FDNY Battalion Chief Lawrence Stack, following his funeral on Friday, June 17, 2016, in St. James, N.Y. Friday would have been the couple's 49th wedding anniversary. Stack died in the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Frank Eltman)  (The Associated Press)

  • New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio arrives at the funeral for Battalion Chief Lawrence Stack on Friday, June 17, 2016, in St. James, N.Y. Nearly 15 years after the Sept. 11 terror attacks, a funeral is being held for a New York City fire chief who died in the World Trade Center collapse. Stack's remains were never found, but his family recently discovered two vials of blood that he had donated during a bone marrow drive for a child with cancer. (AP Photo/Frank Eltman)

    New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio arrives at the funeral for Battalion Chief Lawrence Stack on Friday, June 17, 2016, in St. James, N.Y. Nearly 15 years after the Sept. 11 terror attacks, a funeral is being held for a New York City fire chief who died in the World Trade Center collapse. Stack's remains were never found, but his family recently discovered two vials of blood that he had donated during a bone marrow drive for a child with cancer. (AP Photo/Frank Eltman)  (The Associated Press)

  • Long Beach Calif., Fire Chief Rich Brandt displays bracelets with the names Port Authority Police Officer George Gerard Howard and New York City Fire Department Battalion Chief, Lawrence T. Stack, both of whom died in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center, during Stack's funeral in St. James, N.Y., Friday, June 17, 2016. Stack's remains were never found, but his family is burying two vials of his blood that they recently discovered. Brandt started his career with the FDNY and was friends with Chief Stack. (AP Photo/Frank Eltman)

    Long Beach Calif., Fire Chief Rich Brandt displays bracelets with the names Port Authority Police Officer George Gerard Howard and New York City Fire Department Battalion Chief, Lawrence T. Stack, both of whom died in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center, during Stack's funeral in St. James, N.Y., Friday, June 17, 2016. Stack's remains were never found, but his family is burying two vials of his blood that they recently discovered. Brandt started his career with the FDNY and was friends with Chief Stack. (AP Photo/Frank Eltman)  (The Associated Press)

Nearly 15 years after the Sept. 11 attacks, a funeral has been held for a New York City fire chief who died in the World Trade Center collapse.

The remains of Safety Battalion Chief Lawrence Stack were never found. But his family recently discovered two vials of blood that he had donated during a bone marrow drive for a child with cancer.

On Friday, several thousand firefighters lined the street outside the Long Island church where his funeral Mass was held. New York City's mayor and fire commissioner were among the speakers.

Afterward, the casket bearing the blood vials was placed on top of a ceremonial firetruck, flanked by Stack's firefighter sons.

The strains of bagpipes filled the air as the procession departed for Calverton National Cemetery.