Cellular

AT&T Updates Unlimited Plans in Wake Of Verizon, T-Mobile Changes

The unlimited data plan wars are heating up. Days after Verizon's surprise announcement that it was bringing back unlimited data options and T-Mobile's decision to boost its own plans, AT&T has launched a new—you guessed it!—unlimited data plan.

AT&T announced Thursday that it would expand access to unlimited data plans to all postpaid wireless customers.

The new AT&T Unlimited plan will start at $100 a month for one line, with each additional line adding $40/month. Plans with four lines get the fourth line at no additional charge ($180/month), though that rate is only available after you've paid $220 for two months. Then you'll get a bill credit.

Additionally, the company states that it "may slow speeds during periods of network congestion" after 22 GB of data is used per phone line.

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Verizon has set it's throttling bar to the same level, noting in the announcement of its new plan that "to ensure a quality experience for all customers after 22 GB of data usage on a line during any billing cycle we may prioritize [your] usage behind other customers."

Conversely, T-Mobile says it will no longer charge its T-Mobile ONE unlimited data subscribers for watching full HD non-throttled video.

However, T-Mobile is also increasing its cap for free data tethering to 10 GB of data per month, for consumers who want to use their phones as mobile hotspots to connect their other devices to the internet. (After exceeding 10 GB of data, subscribers are throttled to a 3G connection for the rest of the month, rather than charged for overages.)

Under AT&T's new plan, customers can make unlimited calls from the U.S. to Canada and Mexico, and send unlimited texts to over 120 countries. Those who add the Roam North America feature can also talk, text, and use data in Canada and Mexico with no roaming charges, the company says.

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