A new big-screen adventure will bring James Bond back to movie theaters later this year, but the famed secret agent could be headed to a different kind of theater down the road.

An upcoming stage production of James Bond: The Musical is in the works, according to Playbill, which confirmed the report with executive producer Merry Saltzman. The production is expected to bring back classic Bond villains in stage form and introduce some new, musically inclined allies and enemies for Ian Fleming's iconic super-spy.

Saltzman is the daughter of Harry Saltzman, the Canadian producer who -- with producing partner Albert R. Broccoli -- originally brought the James Bond novels to the screen.

Based around a book by novelist Dave Clarke (Keeping Hannah Waiting) with music and lyrics by country composer Jay Henry Weisz (Driving Home, Only One), James Bond: The Musical will reportedly feature an original storyline instead of an adaptation of one of Fleming's novels. Saltzman indicated that the musical will also introduce "our own Bond girl" in addition to some familiar faces in the supporting cast.

While there have been 25 films featuring James Bond over the years (and multiple video games, television series, comics and other media projects), James Bond: The Musical would become the first major stage production featuring the character. The British secret agent made his debut in Fleming's 1953 novel Casino Royale, and later kicked off one of the longest-running film franchises of all time with 1962's Dr. No, which cast a young Sean Connery (pictured above) as 007.

Later this year, the theatrical version of James Bond returns to the screen in S.P.E.C.T.R.E., the 24th installment of the franchise produced by Eon Productions. Daniel Craig will reprise the role of Bond in the film.

While there's been no casting activity so far for James Bond: The Musical, Saltzman indicated that "production schedules and trial runs are still being worked out" for the production. According to Saltzman, the plan is to bring James Bond: The Musical to the stage as early as 2017 in the U.S.