Tech

Hacker Accused of Targeting U.S. Sites

Schloesser mit den Namen von etlichen Liebespaaren sind  am Donnerstag, 23. April 2009, am Gitter der Hohenzollernbruecke in Koeln zu sehen. Seit Silvester 2008 haben Paare hier ihre Liebe manifestiert und aller Welt kundgetan, indem sie ein Schloss mit ihren Namen an der Bruecke befestigt haben.  Bei dem Schloesser-Trend handelt es sich um einen Brauch aus Italien. In Rom befindet sich eine alte Bruecke, die Milvische Bruecke, die ueber den Tiber fuehrt. Diese Bruecke ist ein regelrechter Wallfahrtsort fuer verliebte Paare. Dort werden Schloesser, auf denen die Namen des Paares eingraviert sind, an der Bruecke fest gekettet und der Schluessel wird in den Tiber geworfen. Dieser Brauch soll die Haltbarkeit der Liebe untersuetzen. (AP Photo/Roberto Pfeil) --Padlocks with the engraved names of lovers are fixed to the fence at the Hohenzollern Bridge in Cologne, western Germany, Thursday, April 23, 2009. In an old ritual, padlocks with lovers names on it are fixed at the Milvian bridge in Roma, Italy, and the keys are thrown into the Tiber river to symbolize endless love. (AP Photo/Roberto Pfeil)

Schloesser mit den Namen von etlichen Liebespaaren sind am Donnerstag, 23. April 2009, am Gitter der Hohenzollernbruecke in Koeln zu sehen. Seit Silvester 2008 haben Paare hier ihre Liebe manifestiert und aller Welt kundgetan, indem sie ein Schloss mit ihren Namen an der Bruecke befestigt haben. Bei dem Schloesser-Trend handelt es sich um einen Brauch aus Italien. In Rom befindet sich eine alte Bruecke, die Milvische Bruecke, die ueber den Tiber fuehrt. Diese Bruecke ist ein regelrechter Wallfahrtsort fuer verliebte Paare. Dort werden Schloesser, auf denen die Namen des Paares eingraviert sind, an der Bruecke fest gekettet und der Schluessel wird in den Tiber geworfen. Dieser Brauch soll die Haltbarkeit der Liebe untersuetzen. (AP Photo/Roberto Pfeil) --Padlocks with the engraved names of lovers are fixed to the fence at the Hohenzollern Bridge in Cologne, western Germany, Thursday, April 23, 2009. In an old ritual, padlocks with lovers names on it are fixed at the Milvian bridge in Roma, Italy, and the keys are thrown into the Tiber river to symbolize endless love. (AP Photo/Roberto Pfeil)  (AP GraphicsBank)

An 18-year-old Greek man has been arrested in Athens, accused of hacking into websites of the U.S. government and the international crime fighting agency Interpol, and engaging in credit card fraud, police said Wednesday.

It took police in Greece two years to find him, with the help of authorities in France and the United States, and the investigation will consider whether the suspect had links to militants. In a raid on the suspect's house in greater Athens on Monday, police seized computers, flares, shotgun cartridges, a homemade incendiary device, 130 fake credit cards, and euro7,850 ($11,500) and $300 (euro205) in cash hidden in a hollowed-out book, police said in a statement.

The suspect, who was not further identified, was arrested there on charges of computer fraud, forgery, illegal violation of privacy, and illegal weapons possession.

The police's cybercrime and anti-terrorism divisions are involved in the investigation, which also will examine possible links between the suspect and local militant groups that have carried out bombings in the past, mostly targeting Greek banks and government agencies.

The alleged cyber attacks occurred in 2008 and 2009 against the U.S. and Interpol sites, with the suspect using botnets: networks of computers carrying malicious software unknown to the users.

The police statement did not identify the computer sites that were allegedly hacked into.