Today I bring you the story of someone we don't know a lot about yet.

He's a guy who was started software company in California and worked hard on it until his business went out of business. He was divorced; had no prospects for a job in California; was in New York but moved to Texas where he was living on his savings and apparently the news of the day drove him to the point of insanity.

Let me be clear: His acts today were the act of a madman.

What we know so far is that he wrote a manifesto, set his house on fire then got into an airplane and flew it into a building in Austin, Texas — a building that housed the IRS.

When I first saw the crash, I wondered if it was a mistake. It reminded me of Sept. 11. I was watching "The Today Show" when they said a plane flew into the World Trade Center. When I saw the gigantic hole, I realized it couldn't have been a mistake. No pilot would fly a plane into a building on a clear day.

The same was true today.

The pilot wrote a manifesto and when the authorities found it on the Web they took it down so they could look at it first.

He was quite appalled that government could bail out two entire industries — spending billions in days — while health care was unresolved.

He wrote that the tax code is so complicated that it holds the people accountable to a tax code that only an industry of lawyers and accountants can understand.

He wrote: "I am finally ready to stop this insanity. Well, Mr. Big Brother IRS man, let's try something different; take my pound of flesh and sleep well."

It was several pages of lunacy. He ended it with this: "The communist creed: From each according to his ability, to each according to his need. The capitalist creed: From each according to his gullibility, to each according to his greed."

When you hear his anti-business and anti-capitalist ravings he sounds like parts of a Van Jones speech. When you listen to his anti-tax ravings he sounds like he is reading bumper stickers off the signs of a Tea Party.

At this hour, I have no idea if this guy is left or right, but here's the point: It doesn't matter. The guy is a killer.

On Sept. 11, we didn't know who orchestrated the attack. By Sept. 20, we knew it was Usama bin Laden. And soon, we started to see people come out and say, "Well, I don't agree with the tactics, but I see his point."

I don't! I don't see Timothy McVeigh's point either.

They're killers. And, as a society, we should condemn all of these guys.

I have told you before: When something bad happens — when someone grabs a gun or like today does something crazy — it does not help the republic, they hurt the republic.

— Watch "Glenn Beck" weekdays at 5 p.m. ET on Fox News Channel