Dinosaurs

19 crazy critters from the cretaceous

If you've ever searched for dinos on the Internet, chances are, you've come across the drawings of Nobu Tamura. What began as a hobby in 2006, when he realized most dinosaurs on Wikipedia had no photos due to copyright, Tamura is now one of the most prolific producers of up-to-date paleo critters on the web. He's shared with us his 19 favorite. For his complete works, check out his blog.

Concavenator_new_NT.jpg

Concavenator corcovatus, the Spanish sensation had a strange hump on its back, the function of which is unknown. Fossils also show evidence of quilled feathers on its arms, although that claim has been disputed. This medium sized Spanish theropod is known from a single relatively complete skeleton.

Nobu Tamura

Cryolophosaurus_NT.jpg

Cryolophosaurus ellioti has been informally named "Elvisaurus" because of a crest that resembles the haircut of the King. It is the first theropod found on the continent of Antarctica.

Nobu Tamuar

Carbonemys_NT.jpg

Carbonemys was a large side-necked turtle that could reach a length of 2m. It had a powerful bite sufficient to crush young crocodiles.

Nobu Tamura

Microraptor_new_NT.jpg

Microraptor zhaoianus, a four-winged dinosaur, was shown to prey on birds.

Nobu Tamura

Dryptosaurus_NT.jpg

Dryptosaurus aquilunguis is known from very fragmentary remains. There are however enough of them to be able to classify it as a tyrannosaurid of some sort. Aiilunguis also means "eagled clawed."

Nobu Tamura

Falcatus_NT.jpg

Falcatus falcatus, an odd looking shark.

Nobu Tamura

Kronosaurus2 NT.jpg

Kronosaurus queenslandicus, a giant marine reptile from Australia.

Nobu Tamura

Spinosaurus NT.jpg

Spinosaurus, a fish-eating dinosaur.

Nobu Tamura

Tianyulong_new NT.jpg

Tianyulong confuciusi is is a small ornithischian dinosaur. Well-preserved fossil show traces of filamentous feather-like structures on the back, tail and neck of the fuzzy animal.

Nobu Tamura

Aegyptocetus_NT.jpg

Aegyptocetus tarfa, an ancestor of the whale is attacked by a shark.

Nobu Tamura

Tyrannosaurus6 NT.jpg

Tyrannosaurus rex, the famed moviestar dino has been slightly modified in light of new studies. Its skull appears to be narrower than previously thought, while its tail is beefier. We also now know it had feathers.

Nobu Tamura

Ctenoimbricata_NT.jpg

Ctenoimbricata spinosa, the sea urchin's great great great grandfather.

Nobu Tamura

Europejara_NT.jpg

Europejara olcadesorum, the toucan flying reptile.

Nobu Tamura

Gerobatrachus_NT.jpg

Gerobatrachus hottoni, an ancestor of the frog.

Nobu Tamura

Futalognkosaurus_NT.jpg

Futalognkosaurus dukei, a titanosaur that was one of the largest land creature that has ever lived with a size estimate rivaling Argentinosaurus. It is also one of the most complete titanosaur known with a combined 70% of the skeleton found from three individuals.

Nobu Tamura

Gigantspinosaurus_NT.jpg

Gigantspinosaurus sichuanensis, a medium sized stegosaur is characterized by its extremely large shoulder spines. It might be the most primitive stegosaur known to date.

Nobu Tamura

Jeholornis NT.jpg

Jeholornis palmapenis (really?), a large primitive bird with a tail with feathers arranged like a palm tree.

Nobu Tamura

Nyctosaurus_NT.jpg

Nyctosaurus gracilis, an extraordinary pterosaur with an unusually large and elaborate cranial crest on top of its head. It is also the only pterosaur to have lost its clawed fingers, indicating that it must have spent the majority of its time in flight. The exact function of the crest is unknown but it is likely that it was used for display. The antler-like crest only appears on the new two specimens described by Bennett (2003), previous specimens being either crestless or with the crest not preserved, indicating a possible sexual dimorphism.

Nobu Tamura

Sauropelta_NT.jpg

Sauropelta edwardsorum, a small armored nodosaur with long spines projecting from its neck.

Nobu Tamura

19 crazy critters from the cretaceous

If you've ever searched for dinos on the Internet, chances are, you've come across the drawings of Nobu Tamura. What began as a hobby in 2006, when he realized most dinosaurs on Wikipedia had no photos due to copyright, Tamura is now one of the most prolific producers of up-to-date paleo critters on the web. He's shared with us his 19 favorite. For his complete works, check out his blog.

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