White House

Ivanka Trump calls for 'religious tolerance' after bomb threats aimed at Jewish centers

Ivanka Trump, right, walks with her husband Jared Kushner, senior adviser to the president, to a news conference with President Donald Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, Friday, Feb. 10, 2017, at the White House in Washington

Ivanka Trump, right, walks with her husband Jared Kushner, senior adviser to the president, to a news conference with President Donald Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, Friday, Feb. 10, 2017, at the White House in Washington  (AP)

Ivanka Trump took to Twitter to call for religious tolerance following the latest wave of bomb threats that were made against 11 Jewish community centers Monday.

“America is a nation built on the principle of religious tolerance. We must protect our house of worship & religious centers. #JCC,” Trump tweeted.

Trump converted to Judaism before marrying her husband Jared Kushner, who is Orthodox, according to the New York Times.

White House deputy press secretary Lindsay Walters further explained Trump’s message.

“Hatred and hate-motivated violence of any kind have no place in a country founded on the promise of individual freedom,” Walters said in a statement. “The president has made it abundantly clear that these actions are unacceptable.”

The FBI was investigating the threats placed against centers in New Mexico, Alabama, New York, Illinois, Ohio, Texas, Wisconsin, Tennessee, Minnesota, Florida and Oklahoma. The threats were deemed hoaxes, but the centers were evacuated as a precaution, the Times reported.

“While we are relieved that all such threats have proven to be hoaxes and that not a single person was harmed, we are concerned about the anti-Semitism behind these threats, and the repetition of threats intended to interfere with day-to-day life,” David Posner, director of strategic performance at JCC Association of North America, said in a statement.

President Trump had yet to comment on the threats as of early Tuesday. He received some criticism last week after calling a Jewish magazine reporter’s question about anti-Semitism “insulting” and responding that he was the “least anti-Semitic person in the world.”

Meanwhile, in Missouri, dozens of headstones were damaged at a Jewish cemetery near St. Louis.

University City police did not say whether the vandalism at Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery is a hate crime, but it’s believed that some organization was behind the crime and it was not a one individual.

Click for more from The New York Times.