POLITICS

Ecuador's Correa says Trump presidency would benefit Latin American left

Ecuador's President Rafael Correa speaks to the press at the government palace in Quito, Ecuador, late Thursday Sept. 30, 2010.  The army rescued Correa from a hospital where he had been trapped by rebellious police for more than 12 hours while he was being treated for tear-gas fired by hundreds of police angry over a law that they claim would cut their benefits. (AP Photo/Patricio Realpe)

Ecuador's President Rafael Correa speaks to the press at the government palace in Quito, Ecuador, late Thursday Sept. 30, 2010. The army rescued Correa from a hospital where he had been trapped by rebellious police for more than 12 hours while he was being treated for tear-gas fired by hundreds of police angry over a law that they claim would cut their benefits. (AP Photo/Patricio Realpe)  ((AP Photo/Patricio Realpe))

At least one Latin American leader sees the silver lining in a possible Donald Trump White House.

The leftist Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa said a Trump presidency might be bad for the United States, but it could be good for Latin America. Especially its progressive political movements.

"I think it would be very bad for the U.S.," Correa said of a possible President Trump, according to Telesur. "However, since Latin America is quite independent from the U.S., I think we may even see an increase in the progressive trend here. That would be a major positive of a Trump victory."

Correa referenced the years that former President George W. Bush was in the White House, which coincided with the so-called “Pink Tide” – a group of left-wing, progressive leaders who came into power in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador and Venezuela.

A Trump presidency would be similar to that of George W. Bush, who, with what Correa called his "primitive" politics, alienated much of the world.

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The Ecuadorean president had high praise for both Democratic candidates running for president in the U.S., especially Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont – saying he is "breaking ways of thinking" with his anti-establishment politics.  

"He is 74 years old and has the support of young people. Why? Because he is iconoclastic, he is against Wall Street, against the big transnational corporations. He is saying what people want to hear," Correa said.

He added that he also admires former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, but he believes she is “more with the establishment” than Sanders is and will not provide the kind of radical change espoused by the Vermont lawmaker.

The president's comments came as Americans in 12 states went to the polls in the Super Tuesday contests that saw Trump and Clinton emerge as the day’s big winners.

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