POLITICS

Supreme Court grants Texas extra 8 days on immigration case, not 30

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 20:  Supporters of immigration reform protest outside the U.S. Supreme Court November 20, 2015 in Washington, DC. The protesters demanded the implementation of U.S. President Barack Obama's immigration relief programs, including the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents and expanded Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, during the protest.  (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 20: Supporters of immigration reform protest outside the U.S. Supreme Court November 20, 2015 in Washington, DC. The protesters demanded the implementation of U.S. President Barack Obama's immigration relief programs, including the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents and expanded Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, during the protest. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)  (2015 Getty Images)

Texas was granted a fraction of the extra time the state was requesting to respond to the Obama administration's appeal of its immigration executive actions shielding millions of undocumented immigrants from deportation.

The schedule the court outlined on Tuesday gives Texas only eight of the 30 additional days it wanted. That would allow arguments to be held in April and a decision to be issued two months later. If the justices rule for the administration in that time frame, President Barack Obama would have roughly seven months in office to implement his plan.

The administration's executive actions, announced late last year, would extend a 2012 deportation protection program to more people who entered the U.S. illegally at a young age as well as to the parents of children who are U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents. Altogether more than 4 million people living in the country illegally could be affected by the change.

Texas and 25 other states challenged the actions in federal court, and District Court Judge Andrew S. Hanen temporarily blocked the program in February. In a ruling in November upholding Hanen's injunction, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th District said the actions "would dramatically increase the number of aliens eligible for work authorization, thereby undermining Congress's stated goal of closely guarding access to work authorization and preserving jobs for those lawfully in the country."

Based on reporting by the Associated Press.

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