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Jindal: Time to Stop Apologizing for America

Obama tours Gulf spill with Jindal

FILE: President Obama talks with U.S. Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Thad Allen and Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal aboard Marine One on May 2 as they fly along the coastline from Venice, La. (Pete Souza / The White House)

Criticizing both the Bush and Obama administrations for failing to execute adequate domestic security policies, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal went on a tear Sunday, criticizing Washington for playing defense, relying on luck and apologizing for protecting the nation from terrorists.

The federal government has to face the fact the War on Terror is about enemies who hate the U.S. way of life, not about social justice, he said.

"The reality is, this isn't about people who don't have enough jobs, who don't have enough social aid, this is about fighting an enemy that hates our way of life," Jindal said on NBC's "Meet the Press."

"This is a fundamental clash of cultures. ... This isn't, well, let's go and figure out a way to apologize for Americans. This isn't how we offended them because we're supporting Israel," he continued.

Jindal, who has had a very public feud with the White House over the administration's handling of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, added that the current president is responsible for leading the country down the wrong path.

"You look at some of President Obama's writings, you look at how he talks about, 'Well, we need to understand the disadvantaged background, this is a matter of social justice and more foreign aid.' Nonsense. The analysts have looked at the terrorists that are coming at us of a disproportionate share or educated, come from privileged backgrounds," he said.

But Jindal also saved criticism for former President George W. Bush, saying his administration handled Shoe Bomber Richard Reid in much the same way.

In his new book "Leadership and Crisis," Jindal writes that the United States' "current therapeutic approach to national security is dangerous. I'm just not interested in empathizing with the grievances of our sworn enemies. Let's figure out where they're vulnerable and destroy them."

Jindal said body searches of  6- and 12-year-old girls traveling to visit their grandparents is illogical. Instead, it's time to dip into methods that rely on information without "political correctness."

"It's so hard to understand why they're so worried about the terrorists' rights and not our rights," Jindal said. "You go back to the Miranda rights for the underwear bomber. What evidence did they need? I mean they caught him with a device. What was the purpose?"

Jindal said a better approach would be using information available to figure out who's most likely to strike.

"I don't think it's profiling, I think it's using information we know. You look at things like, for example, you look at travel patterns, you look at how they purchased their ticket. You look at the information, the intel we've got," he said. 

Jindal added that so far the administration has claimed luck in stopping the bombing of Times Square, the diversion of cargo packages containing bombs and underwear bomber Umar Farouk Mutallab. 

"Luck is not a strategy. We need to be rooting out networks; we need to be killing these terrorists. I think the American people, when they see an administration worried about reading Miranda rights to the underwear bomber. They worry when they see an administration committed to civilian trials," he said.