This is the first time reporters have seen the alleged Fort Hood Shooter since November 5.

I was one of 10 reporters inside the military court at fort hood. We were chosen by lottery - 110 journalists are here.

We expected Major Hasan to be brought into court through a left hand door near the bench where the investigating officer sat.

Just before 8:30 central, I heard the back entrance to the court swing open. I looked over my right shoulder and a man dressed in his fatigues was in a wheelchair and under his own power was making his way to the defense table. His legs were thin and limp as they lay in the vinyl seat.

I was less than 15 feet away when I made eye contact with Major Hasan. His eyes were clear and he looked determined.

This set the tone for the hearing. Hasan spoke clearly and directly - providing simple yes or no answers. Or indicating to the investigating officer he had no questions. Periodically, his body would slide down in the wheelchair and he would raise himself back up with his hands.

His lawyer says he is paralyzed from the nipple down. He has the use of his hands but he is incontinent for urine and there are other medical complications.

There was a moment when Hasan, who wrapped himself in a blanket because he complains of chills, seemed to disconnect from the proceedings. He stared into space and rubbed the side of his face with the blanket as the prosecution and defense discussed the FBI's ongoing analysis of ballistics from the readiness center. It was the closest the hearing came to details of the shooting. Hasan faces 13 counts of murder and 32 for attempted murder.

The article 32 hearing where evidence and witnesses will be heard as part of the military's equivalent of a grand jury is scheduled for Oct 4. The defense request for a delay was granted. The lion's share of the discovery materials, requested months ago, were dumped at the end of last week.

Catherine Herridge is an award-winning Chief Intelligence correspondent for FOX News Channel (FNC) based in Washington, D.C. She covers intelligence, the Justice Department and the Department of Homeland Security. Herridge joined FNC in 1996 as a London-based correspondent.