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Romney Ties Decision on Presidential Bid to Outcome of November Elections

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Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference in Washington Feb. 18. (AP Photo)

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney suggested Sunday that his decision on whether to run again for president may hinge on the outcome of the November midterm elections. 

Romney, who was beat out for the GOP presidential nomination by Sen. John McCain in 2008, told "Fox News Sunday" that he's not making any calls quite yet. He said that he will wait at least until the end of the year, after the voters have a say on their representatives in Congress. 

"I don't really have the pros and cons laid out yet," he said. "It's something which we won't have to decide until some time after the November elections. My guess is after those elections are over and we see where the country is, and we see the features in our own lives that may affect a decision like that, we'll sit down and make a decision." 

Romney has been making the rounds promoting his new book, "No Apology: The Case for American Greatness." The book concentrates heavily on foreign policy, the economy and other fiscal concerns, but deals little with social issues like gun rights, abortion and gay marriage. 

Asked why he was veering away from such topics, Romney said, "there are not a lot of new arguments that I know of to raise in that regard." 

But asked whether those topics would take a back seat in a potential 2012 bid, Romney said "the social issues that this country considers and that are very much in debate today are very important to the nature of America and who we are" and he will continue to speak out on them.