OPINION

Opinion: Peas in my guacamole? Nope, that combination will just not fuse

MIAMI, FL - MARCH 05:  Guacamole sits on a dish at a Chipotle restaurant on March 5, 2014 in Miami, Florida. The Mexican fast food chain is reported to have tossed around the idea that it would temporarily suspend sales of guacamole due to an increase in food costs.  (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

MIAMI, FL - MARCH 05: Guacamole sits on a dish at a Chipotle restaurant on March 5, 2014 in Miami, Florida. The Mexican fast food chain is reported to have tossed around the idea that it would temporarily suspend sales of guacamole due to an increase in food costs. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)  (2014 Getty Images)

As a registered dietitian, I always encourage my clients to add more fruits and vegetables into their diets. Doing so increases the nutritional value of their meals by adding vitamins, minerals, fiber and other essentials nutrients. Incorporating them can be as simple as using it in your smoothies, soups, lasagnas, rice, and even desserts. You name it, almost any dish can be transformed into a healthier meal just be adding a few simple extra ingredients.

English peas have a grainy texture and bit of sweetness that combats the characteristics of the guacamole. There are definitely some combinations that do not go well and I think this is maybe one of them.

- Manuel Villacorta

That being said, the fusion of cuisines and ingredients can be a great thing. But HOLY GUACAMOLE! Peas do not fit in the guacamole. This is just one combination that will not fuse. When you think of the traditional flavor profile of guacamole, it is a creamy, savory flavor with a tangy aftertaste of lime. English peas have a grainy texture and bit of sweetness that combats the characteristics of the guacamole. 

There are definitely some combinations that do not go well and I think this is maybe one of them.

As a Peruvian, I clearly understand the fusion of cuisines. Peru is a country that is known for exactly that. In my country, we have a mixture of different cultures including Italian, Chinese, African, Japanese, and Spanish. Each one bringing their own culinary influence into the cuisine that has become famous around the world. 

Some of our more popular dishes are the end result of a fusion. For example, take our famous Lomo Saltado, an Asian inspired fusion dish, which is a blend of beef tenderloin sautéed in a wok with onions, tomato, cilantro and soy sauce. The soy sauce adds the Asian flare while the cilantro, tomato and onions give it a Peruvian touch.

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As an author of two Peruvian cookbooks, Peruvian Power Foods and Whole Body Reboot, I have been able to take the same fusion idea and incorporate it into some classic American dishes. Take for example my Sweet Potato Waffles. Here I use the Peruvian superfood sweet potato to not only add a unique sweet flavor to the waffles, but also to infuse the dish with anti-oxidant power. 

Not too long ago, I created a frozen yogurt dessert using strawberries and beets. The color was intense, but even better was the complimentary sweetness from both the fruit and the vegetable. Both dishes are a perfect example of how you can marry two different cuisines to make them not only taste delicious, but also to add more nutritional value.

Manuel Villacorta is a registered dietitian in private practice, MV Nutrition, award winning nutrition and weight loss center in San Francisco. He is the founder and creator of Eating Free, an international weight management and wellness program and author of three books, Eating Free: The Carb Friendly Way to Lose Inches, Peruvian Power Foods: 18 Superfoods, 101 Recipes, and Anti-Aging Secrets from the Amazon to the Andes and his newest book, Whole Body Reboot: The Peruvian Superfoods Diet to Detoxify, Energize, and Supercharge Fat Loss.

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