• With: Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn.

    This is a rush transcript from "Your World," September 18, 2013. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

    NEIL CAVUTO, HOST: All right, so more folks being told today if they like their health care plan, well, they can't keep it -- about 1,000 of them to be exact. Walgreens the latest. The country's largest drugstore change, the latest company now to shove its employees over to a private exchange due to the health care law.

    The one solace there is this private exchange is an alternative to the government-run exchanges. We are going to get into this a lot more with the folks running that private exchange on Fox Business tonight.

    Ahead of that, it's just among the many reasons Minnesota Republican Congresswoman Michele Bachmann wants to defund this health care law right now. She joins us.

    Congresswoman, we're seeing a lot more of this. What do you make of this?

    REP. MICHELE BACHMANN, R-MINN.: Well, can you see the smile on my face? I'm so happy because I think we're getting to a consensus now with the Republicans in the House of Representatives.

    We mean this. I think that the leadership has heard the American people loud and clear and they said we don't want to keep funding this government if it means funding ObamaCare. And so you have already heard, Neil, that our leadership announced today that the funding that they're looking at going forward with for the rest of this year will contain defunding of ObamaCare. So we will pass that Friday in the House.

    CAVUTO: Well, you might pass it, Congresswoman. You might pass it, Congresswoman.

    By the way, I misspoke. Walgreens says 120,000, altogether close to one million employees that are being bumped over to either public exchanges or private exchanges.

    BACHMANN: Oh, yes.

    CAVUTO: But, having said that, the argument has always been against defunding this is it goes nowhere after the House. You still have a Senate in the Democratic hands and you have a president who certainly wouldn't sign on to that and he is fairly safe in knowing he has got a veto-proof rejection. What do you think?

    BACHMANN: Well, what I think is that we're going to pass this on Friday in the House. It's going to be a very, very strong vote margin to indicate to the Senate and the president where the House is coming from. It will go to the Senate. There will be a big fight over there.

    But we're running out of time and we're looking at a debt ceiling increase that needs to happen, because we have -- the Treasury Department has taken extraordinary measures since about May 19 of somewhere in the neighborhood of $250 billion. They have gone into little sock drawers and they have pulled $250 billion out to hold us over, but they're running out of rabbits to pull out of a hat.

    (CROSSTALK)

    CAVUTO: Well, Speaker Boehner does not appear to be too enthusiastic about this effort. Is he letting you down? What do make of him?

    BACHMANN: Oh, no, no, no, just the opposite, just the opposite.

    I think that we can take a victory lap here, especially with members of the Tea Party who let their voices be known. And the leader is letting us know he's hearing us. And so I think we're going to see a real fight.

    (CROSSTALK)

    CAVUTO: Well, hearing you is one thing. Well, wait, wait, wait, wait. Hearing you is one thing.

    Is Speaker Boehner's support defunding health care and would push this to the point of shutting the government down if it came to that? Even though you guys argue, maybe properly so, in your view, that it would be the president who would be forcing that issue, he seems to be very uncomfortable doing that.

    BACHMANN: Well, president -- John Boehner isn't looking at shutting the government down. No Republican is.

    We have the full faith and credit act in this bill, but we're looking at fighting on the debt ceiling increase. And we are not going to take no for an answer. The president has been used to getting his way.

    CAVUTO: But you're attaching -- you're attaching health care to that, right? So the president...

    (CROSSTALK)

    BACHMANN: Go ahead.

    CAVUTO: He won't like that. So you would argue he would be shutting the government down if he forced the issue, but isn't that where this is going?

    BACHMANN: I think we're at a very different dynamic now, Neil, because the American people are scared to death of ObamaCare.

    They're getting the premium increases in the mail and they're getting their health care yanked out from under them. So, because the American people now are starting to feel the true effects, everything we have been shouting about from the rooftops, now they're contacting their members of Congress.

    So I think we have a very different world. We have a lot of Democrat senators up for reelection. Do they really want to go back to the voter and say, I had a chance to delay ObamaCare for a year and I didn't do it? So, I think we really have a shot at this, at delaying the impact of ObamaCare for a year. And I think we will tie it to the debt ceiling, and I think the president's going to be in a very tight box. I think we are going to pull this out and I think we're going to win.

    CAVUTO: Well, that one, we have to watch closely.

    Michele Bachmann, thank you very much.

    BACHMANN: Thank you, Neil.

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