House and Home

We've Been Taking Work Breaks All Wrong, Says Study

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 (See, this guy is totally screwing it up.)

Did you just get caught taking a few minutes to update your fantasy football team or Instagram your lunch? Just tell your boss it's making you a better worker.

Two researchers from Baylor University recently published a study, after looking at the break habits of 95 workers, to identify a better break. "What we found was that a better workday break was not composed of many of the things we believed," researcher Emily Hunter says in a press release. For example, it turns out that mid-morning — not afternoon — is the best time for a break. "You should pace yourself, similar to how plants should be watered early in the day before getting distressed from a long day in the sun," Hunter tells the Huffington Post.

Second, don't use the time to run errands. Breaks should be composed of an activity you enjoy — even, counterintuitively, if it's work-related. (Like some kind of "passion project," in the words of HuffPo.)

Finally, the researchers found frequent, smaller breaks are ideal over a singular, longer break. "Unlike your cellphone, which popular wisdom tells us should be depleted to 0 percent before you charge it fully to 100 percent, people instead need to charge more frequently throughout the day," Hunter says. (While they didn't identify an ideal break length, the Huffington Post reports that previous studies have shown as little as five minutes away from work can improve productivity.)

By following their advice for better breaks, researchers say employees will experience less mental and physical burnout.

(In related news, others say a lunchtime walk will cure your work woes.)