Food Trends

Morgan Spurlock opening his own fast food restaurant

Filmmaker Morgan Spurlock is getting into the restaurant business.

Filmmaker Morgan Spurlock is getting into the restaurant business.

Filmmaker Morgan Spurlock, who is probably best known for eating McDonald’s for 30 days in the 2004 documentary “Super Size Me,” is opening a fast food restaurant in Ohio.

In the movie, Spurlock chronicles his own weight gain, climbing cholesterol levels and chronic mood swings as he feasts on nothing but fast food for a month so it may seem ironic that he’s getting into the industry.

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But Spurlock is using his knowledge of processed foods to create what a press release has dubbed a “chicken experience” with food made crafted from hormone-free, antibiotic-free, cage-free, free-range, farm-raised, humanely-raised, 100-percent natural chicken.

Spurlock is a native West Virginian who currently resides in New York City but according to Columbus Business First, Central Ohio was chosen since the region is commonly used as a test market for fast food. Dubbed Holy Chicken!, the restaurant is set to open Nov. 19 in Columbus, Ohio—just an hour away from Chipotle’s new burger venture Tasty Made in Lancaster.

Coming to you November 19th Columbus, OH! Get ready for #holychickenusa #toogoodtobetrue #cluckcluck

A photo posted by Holy Chicken! (@holychickenusa) on

The core item will be a “grilled crispy chicken sandwich” while the kid’s menu will feature chicken tenders. The restaurant will also serve “locally sourced beverages.”

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"Everything about the food is made and backed with integrity and openness, including closing the loop in sustainability by raising our own chickens," Spurlock said in a statement to IndieWire.

Since the early 2000s, Spurlock has used his platform to bring awareness to several issues in the food industry including the use genetically modified organisms (and how seed companies treat farmers), and the intersection of poverty and obesity rates in the developed world.