Bobby Brown denies allegations he abused Whitney Houston: 'The public record is wrong'

Bobby Brown is denying allegations that he abused his late ex-wife, Whitney Houston.

During the 2018 Television Critics Association Summer Press Tour at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Friday, Brown, 49, was asked if his lack of regrets in life extend to instances where his late daughter, Bobbi Kristina, might have witnessed Brown’s alleged abuse of Houston when she was a child.

“There were no violent incidents between myself and Whitney, so no," Brown said of the former couple, who were married for 15 years. 

When further probed about his recollection of 911 dispatch calls placed from his home in 2003 citing domestic violence, Brown doubled down on his denial he ever abused Houston.

“There wasn’t,” he said. “You’re mistaken. You’re completely wrong.”

Whitney Houston and Bobby Brown in 1997.

Whitney Houston and Bobby Brown in 1997.  (Reuters)

A visibly agitated Brown, gave a final rejection when he was asked by another reporter who presented a 2015 article which detailed marks on Houston’s face and cited public record of the calls.

“The public record is wrong,” he said before the panel ended abruptly.

Earlier in the panel, Brown spoke about being at the same location—The Beverly Hilton—Houston was found dead in February 2012, noting that he didn't feel the least bit eerie about returning to the site. 

“No. This is the place they chose, and the spirit of my ex-wife [Whitney Houston] is probably still here,” he said.

“So, it just feels good to be here and to promote this movie, and to be able to smile and be here with my wife [Alicia Etheredge] and my kids. We just came from Hawaii and it’s been a beautiful time. So, being here is just another notch.”

The Grammy award-winning singer, whose new BET movie "The Bobby Brown Story" airs September 4th, also talked about coping with the loss of his daughter, Bobbi Kristina, and how difficult it was to film scenes centered around the late 22-year-old, who died in 2012

“I think that the hardest parts were the scenes with my daughter,” Brown admitted. “I’m still going through missing her and not having her here, so I wasn’t able to sit through the visual parts of the film. It was just hard.”

He continued lamenting about the struggle of dealing with the loss of his daughter and admitted that it continues to be an ongoing process.

“I’m still healing. I don’t think I’ll ever get over it. It’s a day-to-day thing. I go through it every day and I think about it every day. But with the grace of God I’m able to get through my day, and with the grace of my kids and my wife, I’m able to get through my day. So, I’m good.”

Brown’s film aims to chronicle the meteoric rise and fall of the singer, complete with tribulations he suffered through with his drug addiction. But, Brown points out that the perception many may have of him is false, and he wants to set the record straight.

“Some say I’m crazy,” he joked. “I think the biggest misconception of me is that I’m a bad guy.” I think the bad boy came from me being on stage and not from me being a human being,” he said.

“If you’ve seen me in concert, then you can call me a bad guy. If you see me in person and meet me, you’ll call me Bobby.”