Pamela Anderson's thoughts about MAC Cosmetics are no longer warm and fuzzy.

The actress wrote a strongly worded letter expressing outrage that MAC, which has long prided itself on creating cruelty-free makeup, does test products on animals in countries that legally require it for imported cosmetics.

Anderson, a longtime PETA activist and former MAC spokesperson, sent her letter to John Demsey — group president at Estée Lauder, which owns MAC — on Thursday.

“We’ve known each other for a long time, and I’ve always admired you for embracing M.A.C. Cosmetics as a pioneer in cruelty-free makeup. That’s why I was so proud to be a Viva Glam M.A.C. girl in 2004,” she wrote. “But the buzz is much different now, and you know I can’t bite my tongue.”

“When I worked with M.A.C., I found it to be a very progressive and forward-thinking company. That’s why I was very disturbed to learn from PETA that M.A.C., under your direction at Estée Lauder, is selling products in China, where the company funds painful tests on animals in order to meet the country’s archaic regulations. This has tainted the brand and alienated many of the company’s longtime allies.”

MAC acknowledged its practice of having its products tested on animals in China, where it’s required by law for imported cosmetics. “We do not test our products or ingredients on animals, or ask others to test on our behalf, except where required by law,” the company said in a statement.

“[B]efore we are able to import any of our products into China, the Chinese government requires all importers of cosmetics, including us, to pay for animal testing that is conducted by a government-mandated laboratory in China.”

‘We are proud that we were one of the first cosmetic companies to establish that cosmetic safety can be demonstrated by non‐animal testing methods. There are, however, still some countries that believe they need to conduct or require animal testing in order to validate the safety of cosmetic ingredients or products.  Our Company and all of our brands remain dedicated to the elimination of animal testing on all cosmetic products and ingredients worldwide.  We believe that animal testing should not be needed to validate safety of cosmetic products or ingredients and we are encouraging the use of alternatives and the elimination of such animal testing globally.’

Although MAC could choose not to sell its products in countries such as China, “As a global company, we are committed to providing our products and services to our consumers where they live, and we must comply with all legal requirements in the countries where we do business.”

Anderson, 48, urged the company to stop selling in China, noting she has “faith” in the brand.

“Won’t you restore M.A.C. to its former glory as a brand with principles?”

This article originally appeared in the New York Post.