ENTERTAINMENT

Hispanics made up only 5 percent of Hollywood roles last year, USC study finds

LOS ANGELES, CA - MARCH 20:  (L-R) Actress Rosario Dawson, director Diego Luna and actress America Ferrera arrive at the premiere of Pantelion Films And Participant Media's "Cesar Chavez" at the Chinese Theatre on March 20, 2014 in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

LOS ANGELES, CA - MARCH 20: (L-R) Actress Rosario Dawson, director Diego Luna and actress America Ferrera arrive at the premiere of Pantelion Films And Participant Media's "Cesar Chavez" at the Chinese Theatre on March 20, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images)  (2014 Getty Images)

Hollywood is still floundering when it comes to putting women, people of color and other ethnicities and cultures in popular movies.

The University of Southern California’s Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism examined the 700 top-grossing films between 2007 and 2014 and found that Hollywood is still still dominated by non-minorities.

Researched said the results reveal “a complete picture of Hollywood’s indisputable bias against featuring females, people of color and LGBT characters."

In 2014’s 100 most popular movies, the study found that 73.1 percent of all speaking or named characters were white while Hispanic characters only made up 4.9 percent – the lowest among underrepresented minorities.

About 12.5 percent were black, 5.3 percent were Asian and none of the top 100 films starred a female actor older than 45.

USC found little signs of improvement. In 2014's 100 most popular movies, 21 featured a female lead, about the same percentage as the 20 found among the top films of 2007.

Behind the camera isn't better. Of the top 100 films in 2014, two were directed by women. In 2007, there were three. Of the 700 films examined, three were directed by African-Americans.

"By examining the trends over time, it is clear that no progress has been made either on screen or behind the camera when it comes to representing reality," said USC professor Stacy L. Smith, author of the study. "This report reflects a dismal record of diversity for not just one group, but for females, people of color and the LGBT community."

The study adds to a growing body of data that has illustrated equality in the movie industry. In May, the American Civil Liberties Union asked state and federal agencies to investigate the hiring practices by the major studios, networks and talent agencies, specifically in regard to the hiring of female directors.

USC's Media, Diversity and Social Change Initiative has focused on analyzing the most popular movies in recent years, which encompasses most studio releases and some independent films.

Based on reporting by The Associated Press.

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