The Latest: Mladic set to appear before court for verdict

The Latest on the judgment on former Bosnian Serb military chief Gen. Ratko Mladic (all times local):

10.05 a.m.

Lawyers for former Bosnian Serb military chief Gen. Ratko Mladic say that he will appear in a United Nations war crimes tribunal for the judgment in his long-running genocide trial despite health concerns.

In a filing to judges Wednesday shortly before the hearing was due to start at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, Mladic's lawyer say that he "insists on appearing" despite his ailing health. Mladic has been insistent on his innocence.

Mladic is set to hear verdicts on 11 counts of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes for allegedly masterminding atrocities by Serb forces during Bosnia's 1992-95 war.

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9:50 a.m.

The son of former Bosnian Serb military chief Gen. Ratko Mladic says his family is ready for anything as the U.N. Yugoslav war crimes tribunal prepares to rule on whether his father committed genocide and other crimes during the Bosnian war.

Darko Mladic accused the court of "not being objective, and that makes us concerned."

Speaking outside the courthouse in The Hague, Darko Mladic said the prosecution "didn't manage to connect Ratko Mladic with any point of the indictment" and that the family is ready for whatever judgment.

Ratko Mladic's lawyer, Dragan Ivetic, said the general faces a "risk of deterioration of his health, including death, that could be caused by these proceedings."

Mladic stands accused of commanding forces responsible for crimes including the worst atrocities of the 1992-95 war.

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8:20 a.m.

The United Nations' Yugoslav war crimes tribunal is set to pass judgment on former Bosnian Serb military chief Gen. Ratko Mladic, who is accused of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes during Bosnia's devastating 1992-95 war.

Mladic, who faces 11 counts, stands accused of commanding forces responsible for crimes including the worst atrocities of the war — the deadly three-year siege of the Bosnian capital, Sarajevo, and the 1995 massacre of some 8,000 Muslim men and boys in the eastern enclave of Srebrenica, which was Europe's worst mass killing since World War II.

The three judge panel will rule Wednesday on whether the 75-year-old former general is guilty or innocent and, if they convict Mladic, they will immediately pass sentence.

Prosecutors have sought a life sentence.