British ex-Royal Marine sells war medals to help little girl with cancer treatment

A British Royal Marine veteran is selling his three war medals to help a little girl receive the funding needed to treat her rare cancer.

Matthew Goodman, 35, of Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, said he decided to sell his medals after reading about Lottie Woods-John and her fight with neuroblastoma, according to The Sun.

“When I came across Lottie’s campaign, I was heartbroken to read her battle against childhood cancer,” Goodman told The Sun.

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“As a father myself, I couldn’t imagine seeing my baby daughter, Freya, suffering like that and I knew I had to help in some way,” Goodman continued.

Goodman was awarded his medals after serving in the Iraq War. He hopes the money from the medals would help close the gap for the $256,880 needed to help fund treatment for the little girl, whom he has never met.

“My medals were just sitting in the drawer doing nothing, and I thought they could be used for something worthwhile,” Goodman said.

“They were awarded for the sacrifices I made, but I’m happy to forego that honor if it means helping a little girl in desperate need.”

Lottie was diagnosed with the rare cancer in June 2016 after her stomach began to swell and doctors discovered a large tumor in her stomach. Her parents, Charlottes Woods, 36, and David John, 44, were told Lottie had stage 4 cancer.

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The little girl has received chemotherapy, immunotherapy and underwent an operation last year to remove 95 percent of her tumor but needs a vaccine treatment that is available in the United States.

“The vaccine treatment prevents the cancer from returning, so Lottie needs the cutting-edge treatment straight away, meaning we need the $256,880 imminently,” Charlotte, Lottie’s caretaker, told The Sun.

Charlotte said she was overwhelmed after Goodman told her he would sell his three medals to help pay for her treatment.

“When Matt contacted me to tell me he wanted to sell his medals to help towards treatment costs I was speechless,” Woods said.

“He risked his life for those medals and the fact that he’s not even met Lottie, but wants to help keep her alive is mind-blowing. I can’t thank him enough.”

Goodman said he hopes his gesture would set a positive example for his daughter.

 “I hope to set a really nice example to my daughter when she grows up,” Goodman said.

“To show her how to be compassionate and make sacrifices for others. Once they’re sold, in the place of my medals I’ll be wearing a childhood cancer awareness ribbon.”

“For me, nothing is worth a child’s life,” Goodman concluded.