Europe

Le Pen visits French factory, Macron wins ally before runoff

  • Far-right candidate for the 2017 French presidential election Marine Le Pen attend with Nicolas Dupont-Aignan a media conference in Paris, France, Saturday, April 29, 2017. Far-right candidate Marine Le Pen says her new campaign ally, Nicolas Dupont-Aignan, would be her prime minister if she is elected. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)

    Far-right candidate for the 2017 French presidential election Marine Le Pen attend with Nicolas Dupont-Aignan a media conference in Paris, France, Saturday, April 29, 2017. Far-right candidate Marine Le Pen says her new campaign ally, Nicolas Dupont-Aignan, would be her prime minister if she is elected. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)  (The Associated Press)

  • French centrist presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron visits a farm in Usseau, central France, Saturday, April 29 , 2017. Macron faces far-right presidential candidate Marine Le Pen in a May 7 runoff election. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

    French centrist presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron visits a farm in Usseau, central France, Saturday, April 29 , 2017. Macron faces far-right presidential candidate Marine Le Pen in a May 7 runoff election. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)  (The Associated Press)

  • Independent centrist presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron looks at some of the 2,500 photographs of young Jews deported from France, during a visit to the Shoah memorial in Paris, France, Sunday, April 30, 2017. French presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron is visiting the Holocaust Memorial in Paris with a somber message: Never again. (Philippe Wojazer/Pool Photo via AP)

    Independent centrist presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron looks at some of the 2,500 photographs of young Jews deported from France, during a visit to the Shoah memorial in Paris, France, Sunday, April 30, 2017. French presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron is visiting the Holocaust Memorial in Paris with a somber message: Never again. (Philippe Wojazer/Pool Photo via AP)  (The Associated Press)

France's presidential candidates are pushing their rival worldviews, as far-right Marine Le Pen calls the euro currency "dead" and centrist Emmanuel Macron visits a Holocaust memorial and calls for political unity.

With a week left before the May 7 runoff, Le Pen paid a surprise visit Sunday to a woodchip factory accused of polluting the Mediterranean Sea.

Le Pen told Le Parisien newspaper that "I think the euro is dead." She offered to allow big companies that operate internationally to continue using the euro while ordinary citizens would use a new franc.

Macron won a new ally with an endorsement from once-prominent centrist Jean-Louis Borloo. Macron called in the Journal du Dimanche newspaper for a new "arch" reaching across left and right to rebuild French politics.