The Latest on the aftermath of the failed military coup in Turkey (all times local):

2:40 p.m.

The Turkish president's spokesman is criticizing what he says is a German ban on an appearance by President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in a live broadcast at an anti-coup rally in Germany.

Ibrahim Kalin said Sunday Turkey was "curious what the real reason is behind why German local courts and the Constitutional Court have prevented Recep Tayyip Erdogan's message, and hope German officials will provide a satisfactory explanation."

Police in the German city of Cologne say Turkey's sports minister is expected to attend Sunday's rally, but authorities imposed the condition that no messages from speakers elsewhere, such as politicians in Turkey, could be shown on a video screen. Germany's highest court rejected a complaint against that ban Saturday.

German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier has said that there is "no place in Germany" for any side to "bring domestic political tensions from Turkey to us in Germany and intimidate people with other political convictions."

As many as 30,000 participants are expected to attend.

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12:20 p.m.

Thousands of supporters of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan are expected to demonstrate in the German city of Cologne amid heavy police presence.

Some 30,000 participants are expected at Sunday's demonstration, which comes amid tensions following the failed coup attempt in Turkey and concern in Germany over the extent of the Turkish government's subsequent crackdown.

Four much smaller counter-protests are also planned, including one by a right-wing German group. Police plan to have 2,700 officers in place.

Germany is home to roughly 3 million people with Turkish roots.

German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier said that there is "no place in Germany" for any side to "bring domestic political tensions from Turkey to us in Germany and intimidate people with other political convictions."

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12:05 p.m.

A new presidential decree has introduced sweeping reforms to Turkey's military in the wake of the failed coup in the country.

Sunday's decree gives the president and prime minister the authority to issue direct orders to the commanders of the army, air force and navy. It also shuts down military schools, establishes a new national defense university, puts the force commanders directly under the defense ministry and announces the discharge of 1,389 military personnel.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has launched a sweeping crackdown on those he accuses of being involved in the July 15 attempted coup.

In an interview with private A Haber television Saturday, Erdogan said he also wants to put the country's intelligence agency and the chief of general staff's headquarters under the presidency.