Europe

The Latest: French PM: Brexit will benefit Paris businesses

  • A "Remain" supporter, her face painted to resemble the EU flag, walks on Park Lane in London, as protesters marched to Parliament Square to show their support for the European Union in the wake of last weeks referendum decision for Britain to leave the EU, known as "Brexit", Saturday July 2, 2016. Demonstrators wearing EU flags as capes and with homemade banners saying "Bremain" and "We Love EU" gathered on the streets around Park Lane for the March for Europe rally. (Jonathan Brady/PA via AP)

    A "Remain" supporter, her face painted to resemble the EU flag, walks on Park Lane in London, as protesters marched to Parliament Square to show their support for the European Union in the wake of last weeks referendum decision for Britain to leave the EU, known as "Brexit", Saturday July 2, 2016. Demonstrators wearing EU flags as capes and with homemade banners saying "Bremain" and "We Love EU" gathered on the streets around Park Lane for the March for Europe rally. (Jonathan Brady/PA via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • A "Remain" supporter walks near Park Lane in London, as protesters marched to Parliament Square to show their support for the European Union in the wake of last weeks referendum decision for Britain to leave the EU, known as "Brexit", Saturday July 2, 2016. Demonstrators wearing EU flags as capes and with homemade banners saying "Bremain" and "We Love EU" gathered on the streets around Park Lane for the March for Europe rally. (Jonathan Brady/PA via AP)

    A "Remain" supporter walks near Park Lane in London, as protesters marched to Parliament Square to show their support for the European Union in the wake of last weeks referendum decision for Britain to leave the EU, known as "Brexit", Saturday July 2, 2016. Demonstrators wearing EU flags as capes and with homemade banners saying "Bremain" and "We Love EU" gathered on the streets around Park Lane for the March for Europe rally. (Jonathan Brady/PA via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Women hold posters during a protest opposing Britain's exit from the European Union in Berlin, Saturday, July 2, 2016. About 50 people staged a protest Saturday in front of Berlin’s Brandenburg Gate against the recent British referendum to leave the European Union.  (AP Photo /Markus Schreiber)

    Women hold posters during a protest opposing Britain's exit from the European Union in Berlin, Saturday, July 2, 2016. About 50 people staged a protest Saturday in front of Berlin’s Brandenburg Gate against the recent British referendum to leave the European Union. (AP Photo /Markus Schreiber)  (The Associated Press)

The Latest on Britain's vote to leave the 28-nation European Union (all times local):

1:25 p.m.

France's prime minister says Britain's vote to leave the European Union is a business opportunity for Paris.

Prime Minister Manuel Valls says the government is working on enhancing the French capital's attractiveness, especially measures regarding taxes and expatriates' status. He spoke to the Le Parisien newspaper in an interview published Saturday.

Valls tells international companies: "Welcome in Paris! Come and invest in France!"

Due to the British vote to leave the EU, some businesses based in London are considering leaving for other cities like Dublin, Amsterdam, Frankfurt and Paris to benefit from the large EU common market.

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1 p.m.

Thousands of European Union supporters are singing, dancing and marching through the streets of London to protest the United Kingdom's vote to leave the EU.

Saturday's 2-mile (3-kilometer) "March for Europe" from Hyde Park to Parliament was organized on social media. Many of the marchers say they hope U.K. lawmakers will block any moves to leave the 28-nation bloc. Some 48 percent of voters in the June 23 referendum wanted to remain in the EU.

One organizer, comedian Mark Thomas, says British lawmakers should not work for an exit based on a result driven by anti-EU campaigners' exaggerations and distortions about immigration and EU spending.

Thomas said: "We would accept the result of the referendum if it was fought on a level playing field. But it was full of misinformation."